slippery elm (generic name)

an herbal product - treats Diarrhea, Gastrointestinal disorders, Sore throat, and Cancer
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Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Abscesses, abortifacient, abrasions, acidity, anal fissures, antihelminthic (expels worms), antioxidant, boils, bronchitis, burns, carbuncles, colitis, cold sores, congestion, constipation, cough, cystitis, demulcent, diuretic, diverticulitis, dysentery, emollient, eruptions, esophageal reflex, expectorant, gout, gynecological disorders, heart burn, hemorrhoids, herpes, immunomodulation, inflammation, laxative, lung problems, milk tolerance, pleurisy, psoriasis, rheumatism, swollen glands, synovitis, syphilis, toothache, typhoid fever, ulcerative colitis, vaginitis, varicose ulcers, wounds.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is no proven effective dose for slippery elm in adults. Slippery elm could theoretically slow down or decrease absorption of other oral medications due to hydrocolloidal fibers, although there is a lack of actual interactions reported. Teas, decoctions, liquid extracts, powdered inner bark preparations, and capsules/tablets are all commercially available.

Slippery elm bark 400-500-milligram tablets or capsules taken three or four times daily have been studied, although strengths may vary due to lack of standardization. Lower doses of 200-milligram capsules twice or three times per day have been used for bronchitis.

Slippery elm has been applied on the skin for wound care and inflammation. Typically, the coarse powdered inner bark is mixed with boiling water to make a paste. Various concentrations and application schedules have been used.

Children (younger than 18 years)

Traditionally, it has been accepted that slippery elm can be used safely in children complaining of stomach upset and diarrhea. However, there are no safety studies conducted in this area, and therefore use in children should only be under the strict supervision of a licensed healthcare professional.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Known allergy or hypersensitivity such as hives (urticaria) has been reported with slippery elm; some persons may have contact sensitivity to elm tree pollen (or sensitivity when breathing it in), but the frequency of allergic reactions to medicinal use of elm bark products is extremely rare.

Side Effects and Warnings

Contact dermatitis and urticaria have been reported after exposure to slippery elm or an oleoresin contained in the slippery elm bark. Based on historical accounts, whole bark of slippery elm (but not inner bark) may possess abortifacient properties.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Avoid during pregnancy due to the risk of contamination with slippery elm whole bark, which may increase the risk of miscarriage.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Slippery elm could theoretically slow down or decrease the absorption of other oral medications due to hydrocolloidal fibers, although there is a lack of actual interactions reported. Slippery elm contains tannins, which could theoretically decrease the absorption of nitrogen-containing substances such as alkaloids, although there is a lack of actual interactions reported.

Interactions with Herbs and Supplements

Slippery elm could theoretically slow down or decrease the absorption of other herbs or supplements taken by mouth due to hydrocolloidal fibers, although there is a lack of actual interactions reported. Slippery elm contains tannins, which could theoretically decrease the absorption of nitrogen-containing substances such as alkaloids, although there is a lack of actual interactions have been reported.

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