glucosamine (generic name)

a nutraceutical product - treats Inflammatory bowel disease, Rheumatoid arthritis, Temporomandibular joint, Rehabilitation, Osteoarthritis, Pai...
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Interactions with Drugs

In theory, glucosamine may decrease the effectiveness of insulin or other drugs used to control blood sugar levels. However, there is limited human research to suggest that glucosamine may not have significant effects on blood sugar. Nonetheless, caution is advised when using insulin or drugs for diabetes by mouth. Patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare provider, and medication adjustments may be necessary. Based on limited evidence, the combination of glucosamine with diuretics (water pills), such as furosemide (Lasix®), may cause an increased risk of glucosamine side effects.

In theory, glucosamine may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

In theory, glucosamine may decrease the effectiveness of herbs or supplements that lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may alter blood sugar.

Based on limited human study, side effects of glucosamine may be increased when used at the same time as diuretic herbs or supplements.

In theory, glucosamine may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding

There are preliminary reports that use of glucosamine with vitamin C, bromelain, chondroitin sulfate, or manganese may lead to increased beneficial glucosamine effects on osteoarthritis. Simultaneous use with fish oil may have additive beneficial effects in the treatment of psoriasis, based on preliminary research.


This information is based on a professional level monograph edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ( Ethan Basch, MD (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center); Samuel Basch, MD (Mt. Sinai Medical Center, NY); Renn Crichlow, MD (Harvard Medical School); Dawn Costa, BA, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Edzard Ernst, MD (University of Exeter); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Dana Hackman, BS (Northeastern University); David Kroll, PhD (Duke University); Mary McGarry, RPh (University of Kansas); Erica Seamon, PharmD (Nova Southeastern University); Michael Smith, M.R.PharmS, ND (Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nancy Tannous, PharmD (Northeastern University); Ed Tessier, PharmD, MPH, BCPS (Springfield College, University of Massachusetts); Candy Tsourounis, PharmD (University of California, San Francisco); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Mamta Vora, PharmD (Northeastern University); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Jen Woods, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

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