flaxseed (generic name)

an herbal product - treats Obesity, Dry eye syndrome, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, High blood pressure, Menstrual breast pain, Pre...
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Taking flaxseed (not flaxseed oil) by mouth may reduce the absorption of other medications. Drugs used by mouth should be taken one hour before or two hours after flaxseed to prevent decreased absorption. People taking mood stabilizers such as lithium should use caution. Flaxseed contains alpha-linolenic acid, which may theoretically lower blood pressure. Individuals taking medications to lower blood pressure should use caution when taking flaxseed. Laxatives and stool softeners may increase or enhance the laxative effects of flaxseed. Flaxseed and flaxseed oil can lower cholesterol levels in animals, but studies in humans show mixed results. In theory, flaxseed may increase the effect of other medications that lower lipid (cholesterol and triglyceride) levels in the blood. Hormonal drugs may be affected. Dietary flaxseed may increase the effects of tamoxifen, a medication used to treat cancer. Consult a qualified oncologist and pharmacist before making decisions about treatment or health conditions.

Although studies report conflicting results, the omega-3 fatty acids in flaxseed and flaxseed oil may increase blood sugar, reducing the effects of diabetes treatments, including insulin and glucose-lowering medications taken by mouth. Flaxseed (not flaxseed oil) is a rich source of plant lignans. Lignans are sometimes referred to as phytoestrogens and may possess estrogen-like properties. It is not known if flaxseed can alter the effects of birth control pills or hormone replacement therapies. Flaxseed and flaxseed oil theoretically may increase the risk of bleeding, and caution should be used when flaxseed products are taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Flaxseed may also interact with muscle relaxants (such as metaxalone), drugs used for acid reflex (proton pump inhibitors such as lansoprazole), or prostaglandins (such as Iloprost or treprostinil).

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Consumption of flaxseed (not flaxseed oil) may reduce the absorption of vitamins or supplements taken by mouth at the same time. Therefore, vitamins and supplements should be taken an hour before or two hours after a dose of flaxseed to prevent decreased absorption. Flaxseed may alter the effects of psyllium and vitamin E in particular.

Use caution if combining flaxseed with other mood-altering herbs, including St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), kava (Piper methysticum), or valerian (Valeriana officinalis). Hormonal herbs and supplements may be affected. Flaxseed contains alpha-linolenic acid, which may theoretically lower blood pressure. Use caution when combining flaxseed with other herbs or supplements that can lower blood pressure.

Because of the laxative effects of flaxseed, caution should be used when it is taken with other supplements that have laxative effects.

Studies on the effects of flaxseed on blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes report mixed results. Use caution when combining flaxseed products with supplements that may raise blood sugar levels. In theory, flaxseed may contain estrogen-like chemicals. Use caution when combining flaxseed (not flaxseed oil) with supplements believed to have estrogen-like properties.

Early studies in humans show that flaxseed and flaxseed oil theoretically may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution should be used when flaxseed products are taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding.

Flaxseed may lower blood cholesterol levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower cholesterol. Cholesterol levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Use cautiously when taking flax with other herbs or supplements taken to treat or prevent cancer due to a possible interaction.

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