Cordyceps (generic name)

treats Anti-aging, Hyperlipidemia, Hepatitis B, Asthma, Exercise performance enhancement, Liver disease, Renal failure, Bronchitis, Chemoprotec...
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Interactions with Drugs

Concomitant administration of cordyceps and aminoglycosides may reduce amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) in older people.

Cordyceps may reduce heart rate. Caution is advised in patients with heart disease or those taking antiarrhythmic agents.

Although not well studied in humans, cordyceps may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects. Patients taking hormonal replacement therapy or birth control pills should use cordyceps with caution.

Cordyceps may stimulate the immune system and may decrease the efficacy of immunosuppressants, such as prednisolone or cyclophosphamide.

Use of cordyceps with cyclosporin may reduce nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) in kidney-transplanted patients. Furthermore, administration of cordyceps and gentamycin may return blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), sodium excretion, and urinary NAGase to more normal ranges during drug-induced nephrotoxicity (kidney toxicity). Concomitant administration of cordyceps with kidney-damaging drugs may reduce amikacin-induced kidney damage in older people.

Cordyceps may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare provider. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Cordyceps may lower blood pressure. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood pressure. Patients taking drugs for blood pressure, such as ACE inhibitors, should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist.

Preliminary evidence suggests that cordyceps may have additive effects when used with medications that lower cholesterol. Caution is advised.

Cordyceps mycelium extracts may inhibit monoamine oxidase type B. Patients taking MAOIs (monoamine oxidase inhibitors, a class of antidepressants) such as isocarboxazid (Marplan®), phenelzine (Nardil®), tranylcypromine (Parnate®) should consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, before combining therapies.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Cordyceps may reduce heart rate. Caution is advised in patients with heart disease or those taking antiarrhythmic agents.

Although not well studied in humans, cordyceps may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

Cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects. Patients taking herbs and supplements with potential hormonal effects, such as black cohosh or St. John's wort, should use cordyceps with caution.

Cordyceps may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Cordyceps may lower blood pressure. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood pressure.

Cordyceps may stimulate the immune system and may decrease the efficacy of immunosuppressants.

Preliminary evidence suggests that cordyceps may have additive effects when used with herbs or supplements that lower cholesterol, such as red yeast rice. Caution is advised.

Cordyceps mycelium extracts may inhibit monoamine oxidase type B. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs and supplements with potential MAOI (monoamine oxidase inhibitor, anti-depressant) activity. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, before combining therapies.

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