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  • Farydak Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Farydak (panobinostat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood. Affecting mostly older adults, the disease causes blood plasma cells to...

  • Most HIV Infections Come From Undiagnosed or Untreated People: Study

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If an American becomes infected with HIV, chances are he or she contracted the virus from someone who didn't know they were infected or wasn't getting proper treatment. That's the message of a new U.S....

  • Ears May Have Natural Defense Against Loud Noise, Mouse Study Shows

    FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Ears have a natural mechanism to help protect them against extremely loud and damaging noises, new research suggests. Researchers pinpointed a connection from a part of the ear known as the cochlea to the...

  • Golden Anniversaries May Bring an Added Special Glow

    MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study seems to lend credence to the adage that there may be snow on the rooftop but there's fire in the furnace. People in the early years of marriage have sex more frequently, but then levels of...

  • Moldy Homes May Mean More Asthma in Young Kids

    MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children appear more likely to develop asthma if their living rooms, kitchens or bedrooms have mold or moisture damage, according to a new study. Children were most susceptible to developing asthma with...

  • U.S. Teens Getting Less Sleep Than Ever

    MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- American teens don't get enough sleep, and the problem has only gotten worse since the 1990s, new research shows. Just 63 percent of 15-year-olds reported getting seven or more hours of sleep a night in...

  • New Name, New Criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

    TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness affecting up to 2.5 million Americans, may soon get a new name and set of diagnostic criteria. In a report released Tuesday, an independent panel of expert...

  • Health Highlights: Feb. 6, 2015

    Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Slight Rise in Ebola Cases: WHO For the first time this year, there has been a slight rise in the number of Ebola cases in West Africa, the...

  • Ebola Threat Diminishing in West Africa, Officials Say

    TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- West Africa's Ebola epidemic has slowed significantly, but health officials are hesitant to say the lethal virus is no longer a threat. Ebola infections have killed more than 8,600 people and sickened...

  • Realistic Targets May Boost Exercise Rates, Experts Say

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who are sedentary should focus on small increases in their activity level and not dwell on public health recommendations on exercise, according to new research. Current targets call for 150...

  • The Mind May Be a Muscle Booster

    MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The mind can play a key role in maintaining muscle strength in limbs that are placed in a cast for a prolonged period of time, a new study suggests. The researchers said mental imagery might help reduce th...

  • Health Tip: What Causes a Cold Sore?

    (HealthDay News) -- A cold sore is a painful sore that often forms on the lips or around the mouth. While a cold sore is caused by the herpes virus, many factors can act as triggers. The American Academy of Dermatology says potential triggers...

  • Health Tip: Have Your Child's Eyes Checked

    (HealthDay News) -- An annual vision exam is a good idea for children, starting in infancy. Kids at increased risk of vision problems may need to get an exam more frequently. The American Optometric Association says risk factors for childhood...

  • For Anorexic Men, the Focus Is on Muscle

    MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexia is typically associated with women, but a new report finds that men -- especially men obsessed with muscularity -- can develop the eating disorder, too. The Canadian researchers noted that an...

  • Keep Dogs and Cats Safe During Winter

    SATURDAY, Dec. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Winter can be tough on dogs and cats, but there are a number of safe and effective ways you can help them get through the cold season, an expert says. "Sidewalks, driveways and steps are often coated wit...

  • Rapivab Approved to Help Treat Flu

    MONDAY, Dec. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Rapivab (peramivir) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat influenza. The intravenous drug inhibits an enzyme that releases viral particles from infected cells, the FDA...

  • Preschoolers Need Eye Screening, Experts Say

    FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- All children should have their eyesight checked between the ages of 3 and 6, preferably every year, eye experts say. The new vision-screening guidelines for preschool-aged children are from an expert panel...

  • Health Highlights: Dec. 10, 2014

    Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Ebola Fighters Are Time's 2014 Person of the Year Time has chosen the Ebola fighters as its 2014 Person of the Year. "Ebola is a war, and a...

  • Expert Shares Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Tips

    THURSDAY, Nov. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Thanksgiving meals can pose a challenge for people who have to eat a gluten-free diet, an expert says. Many traditional Thanksgiving dishes -- such as turkey, corn, sweet potatoes and cranberry sauce --...

  • Many People Who Drink a Lot Aren't Alcoholics: CDC

    THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most people who drink to excess or binge drink are not alcoholics, a new U.S. government report says. In fact, 90 percent of those who drink too much aren't dependent on alcohol. But one in three adults...

  • Health Tip: What's Behind Your Sore Throat?

    (HealthDay News) -- A sore throat has a litany of possible causes, including an allergy, air pollution, dry air or exposure to tobacco smoke. The culprit also may be a virus, notably the common cold. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

  • Could Flu Raise Risk of Fatal Artery Tear?

    SUNDAY, Nov. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza is a nasty virus in its own right. But, it might also increase a person's risk of suffering a life-threatening tear in the body's most important artery, a new study suggests. During flu season, a...

  • CPR Phone Guidance Boosts Cardiac Arrest Survival, Study Says

    SATURDAY, Nov. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Talking bystanders through CPR methods for a cardiac emergency during a 911 call can significantly boost survival rates, a new study suggests. State researchers in Arizona examined the aggressive use of...

  • Doctor With Ebola Coming to U.S. for Treatment

    FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A doctor from Sierra Leone who lives in the United States and became infected with Ebola in his native country will be flown Saturday to a specialized hospital in Nebraska for treatment, according to...

  • Genes of Oldest People Offer No Insights to Long Life

    WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The genes of the world's oldest people have been sequenced, but the decoding effort did not reveal any genes strongly linked with an exceptionally long lifespan, scientists report. Researchers performed...

  • HPV Vaccination Rates Lowest in States With Highest Cervical Cancer Rates: Study

    TUESDAY, Nov. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The states with the lowest rates for teen vaccinations against the virus believed to cause most cervical cancers are also the states where cervical cancer rates are the highest, a new study finds. For...

  • Irregular Heartbeat Doubles Risk for 'Silent Strokes,' Review Suggests

    TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Atrial fibrillation, a common condition where the heart beats abnormally, may more than double the risk of "silent" strokes, a new review suggests. Silent strokes have no signs or symptoms, but can affect...

  • Tips for Safe Trick-or-Treating

    SATURDAY, Oct. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Arriving home safe and sound is one of the best Halloween treats of all. To that end, be sure that costumes and goody bags have reflective strips that improve visibility to drivers, said Dr. Sampson...

  • CDC Tightens Rules on Caring for Ebola Patients

    MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials on Monday officially tightened guidelines for health workers treating Ebola patients, now requiring full body suits with no skin exposure and use of a respirator at all times. The U.S...

  • Obama Urges Calm in Ebola Scare, Opposes Travel Ban

    SATURDAY, Oct. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama on Saturday asked Americans not to give way to panic over Ebola, and he repeated his opposition to a travel ban for flights from affected countries in West Africa. In his weekly...

  • Family Acceptance Key to Curbing Teen Suicides, Study Shows

    FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Family rejection could be potentially deadly for teens already at risk for suicide, a new study has found. When teens were followed six months after discharge from a psychiatric unit for attempting suicide...

  • Gut Microbes Tied to Jet Lag, Shift-Work Weight Gain

    THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Disruptions in the human circadian clock can throw off microbes in the gut, potentially boosting the risk of obesity, a new study suggests. The results may help explain why shift workers and people who...

  • Post-Op Pain Management Improves in Past Decade, Survey Shows

    TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of American patients who experience serious post-operative pain appears to have fallen significantly over the past decade, a new survey reveals. How significantly? In 2003, 63 percent of...

  • Certain Autoimmune Drugs in Pregnancy May Up Newborn Infection Risk: Study

    FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When given to pregnant women, a common treatment for ulcerative colitis may inadvertently lower their baby's ability to fight off infections at birth, new French research suggests. The treatment, called...

  • Study Compares Insulin Regimens for Type 1 Diabetes

    FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For people with type 1 diabetes, long-acting insulin may be a better treatment choice than intermediate-acting insulin, a new review of the data suggests. "Different types of insulin are used to manage type...

  • FDA Approves New Obesity Drug

    THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new weight-loss drug on Wednesday marks the third time the agency has given its blessing to a new diet medication since 2012. Called Contrave, the...

  • Small Study Hints Fish Oil Might Ease Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

    MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low doses of fish oil may help reduce the number of seizures experienced by people with a form of tough-to-treat epilepsy that no longer responds to drugs, a small new study suggests. The research was led...

  • Gene Research Yields Insights Into Ebola Virus

    THURSDAY, Aug. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic research performed during the early days of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has given scientists unprecedented insight into how the virus mutates and spreads. Researchers report in the Aug. 28...

  • Study: Young Adults Who Had Depression Have 'Hyper-Connected' Brain Networks

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who struggled with depression in adolescence appear to have "hyper-connected" networks in their brain, researchers are reporting. The findings might improve understanding of depression and...

  • Today's ParentsLess Able to Spot Obesity in Their Kids: Study

    MONDAY, Aug. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Parents have become less able to realize when their child is overweight or obese, a new study finds. In fact, parents interviewed between 2005 and 2010 were 24 percent less likely to spot a weight problem...

  • Getting Back to School Sleep Schedules

    SATURDAY, Aug. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As the new school year begins, parents need to get their children and teens back on their normal sleep routines, an expert says. Try to prevent your children from taking naps until they've adjusted to...

  • Consumer Reports Advises Pregnant Women to Avoid Tuna

    THURSDAY, Aug. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- In a new review of seafood safety, Consumer Reports is advising that pregnant women avoid eating tuna due to concerns about mercury exposure. "We're particularly concerned about canned tuna, which is...

  • Robin Williams' Death Shines Light on Depression, Substance Abuse

    TUESDAY, Aug. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The suicide Monday of Academy Award-winning actor and comic star Robin Williams has refocused public attention on depression, its sometimes link to substance abuse and, in tragic cases, suicide. Williams...

  • Fears of U.S. Ebola Outbreak Unwarranted, Experts Say

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The decision to bring two American aid workers infected with Ebola back to the United States has kicked up controversy, causing some to fear a local outbreak of the killer virus. But experts in infectiou...

  • Skip the Steroids for Shoulder Pain?

    TUESDAY, Aug. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For relief of shoulder pain, physical therapy and steroid shots provide similar results, a new study finds. Researchers compared the two nonsurgical approaches in a group of 100-plus adults suffering from...

  • Inflammatory Muscle Disorder May Raise Risk for Heart Attack, Stroke

    MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A common inflammatory muscle disorder that causes pain and stiffness in older people may increase the risk for heart attack and stroke, new research suggests. A British study found that patients with...

  • Your Smartphone Carries Your Personal Bacteria

    TUESDAY, June 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Your smartphone is personalized in a surprising way: It carries the same types of bacteria you have on your body, which suggests the devices could be used as bacterial and health sensors, a new study says...

  • Number of Induced Labors Falling in U.S., CDC Says

    WEDNESDAY, June 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After almost two decades of steady increases, the number of U.S. infants born early due to induced labor and C-section has declined in recent years, according to a new report from the Centers for Diseas...

  • When School's Out, Weight Can Pile On

    THURSDAY, June 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As the school year ends, many children feel they're gaining two months of freedom. But new research suggests many will gain something else: unwanted weight. Between June and August, many U.S. kids pack o...

  • Tick Exposure Can Occur in a Minute in Infested Areas

    SATURDAY, June 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Some areas in the United States have such high tick populations that you can be exposed to the dangerous pests within one minute, an expert warns. "There are areas in this part of the country that the tic...

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