rivaroxaban (generic name)

Xarelto (brand name)

It is used to treat blood clots in the lungs or in the veins
(ri va ROX a ban)
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What is this medicine?

RIVAROXABAN (ri va ROX a ban) is an anticoagulant (blood thinner). It is used to treat blood clots in the lungs or in the veins. It is also used after knee or hip surgeries to prevent blood clots. It is also used to lower the chance of stroke in people with a medical condition called atrial fibrillation.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

-bleeding disorders
-bleeding in the brain
-blood in your stools (black or tarry stools) or if you have blood in your vomit
-history of stomach bleeding
-kidney disease
-liver disease
-low blood counts, like low white cell, platelet, or red cell counts
-recent or planned spinal or epidural procedure
-take medicines that treat or prevent blood clots
-an unusual or allergic reaction to rivaroxaban, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
-pregnant or trying to get pregnant
-breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

If you are taking this medicine after hip or knee replacement surgery, take it with or without food.

If you are taking this medicine for atrial fibrillation, take it with your evening meal. If you are taking this medicine to treat blood clots, take it with food at the same time each day. If you are unable to swallow your tablet, you may crush the tablet and mix it in applesauce. Then, immediately eat the applesauce. You should eat more food right after you eat the applesauce containing the crushed tablet.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you've taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

What if I miss a dose?

If you take your medicine once a day and miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If you take your medicine twice a day and miss a dose, take the missed dose immediately. In this instance, 2 tablets may be taken at the same time. The next day you should take 1 tablet twice a day as directed.

What may interact with this medicine?


-aspirin and aspirin-like medicines
-certain antibiotics like erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin
-certain medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole
-certain medicines for irregular heart beat like amiodarone, quinidine, dronedarone
-certain medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, phenytoin
-certain medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin, enoxaparin, and dalteparin
-conivaptan
-diltiazem
-felodipine
-indinavir
-lopinavir; ritonavir
-NSAIDS, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
-ranolazine
-rifampin
-ritonavir
-St. John's wort
-verapamil

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not stop taking this medicine without first talking to your doctor. Stopping this medicine may increase your risk of having a stroke. Be sure to refill your prescription before you run out of medicine.

This medicine may increase your risk to bruise or bleed. Call your doctor or health care professional if you notice any unusual bleeding.

Be careful brushing and flossing your teeth or using a toothpick because you may bleed more easily. If you have any dental work done, tell your dentist you are receiving this medicine.

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Last Updated: March 06, 2013
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