Butrans (generic name)

It is used to treat moderate to severe pain
(byoo pre NOR feen)
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What if I miss a dose?

If you forget to replace your patch, take off the old patch and put on a new patch as soon as you can. Do not apply an extra patch to your skin. Do not wear more than one patch at the same time unless told to do so by your doctor or health care professional.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

-butorphanol
-nalbuphine
-pentazocine
This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

-alcohol
-antibiotics like erythromycin and clarithromycin
-antihistamines for allergy, cough and cold
-barbiturates like phenobarbital
-carbamazepine
-certain medicines for irregular heart beat
-general anesthetics
-MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate
-medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances
-medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole
-medicines for sleep
-medicines used to treat HIV infection or AIDS like ritonavir, saquinavir, and indinavir
-muscle relaxants
-narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain
-phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine
-phenytoin
-rifampin or rifampicin
-tramadol

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Other pain medicine may be needed when you first start using the patch because the patch can take some time to start working. Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not go away, if it gets worse, or if you have new or a different type of pain. You may develop tolerance to the medicine. Tolerance means that you will need a higher dose of the medicine for pain relief. Tolerance is normal and is expected if you take the medicine for a long time.

Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your body becomes used to the medicine. This does NOT mean you are addicted. Addiction is a behavior related to getting and using a drug for a non-medical reason. If you have pain, you have a medical reason to take pain medicine. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

There are different types of narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain. If you take more than one type at the same time, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing.

The medicine will cause constipation. Try to have a bowel movement at least every 2 to 3 days. If you do not have a bowel movement for 3 days, call your doctor or health care professional.

Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor if the problem does not go away or is severe.

Heat can increase the amount of medicine released from the patch. Do not get the patch hot by using heating pads, heated water beds, electric blankets, and heat lamps. You can bathe or swim while using the patch. But, do not use a sauna or hot tub. Tell you doctor or health care professional if you get a fever.

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Last Updated: August 29, 2012
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