Kidney Stones supplements
Kidney Stones

  • Phosphorus is a mineral found in many foods, such as milk, cheese, dried beans, peas, colas, nuts, and peanut butter. Phosphate is the most common form of phosphorus. In the body, phosphate is the most abundant intracellular anion. It is critical for energy storage and metabolism, for the utilization of many B-complex vitamins, to buffer body fluids, for kidney excretion of hydrogen ions, for proper muscle and nerve function, and for maintaining calcium balance. Phosphorus is vital to the formation of bones and teeth, and healthy bones and soft tissues require calcium and phosphorus to grow and develop throughout life. Inadequate intake of dietary phosphate can lead to hypophosphatemia (low levels of phosphate in the blood), which can lead to long-term potentially serious complications. Conversely, excess phosphate intake can lead to hyperphosphatemia (high blood phosphorus levels), which can occur particularly in people with impaired kidney function and can lead to potentially serious electrolyte imbalances, adverse effects, or death. In adults, phosphorus makes up approximately 1% of total body weight It is present in every cell of the body, although 85% of the body's phosphorus is found in the bones and teeth. Phosphates are used clinically to treat hypophosphatemia, hypercalcemia (high blood calcium levels), as saline laxatives, and in the management of calcium-based kidney stones. They may also be of some benefit to patients with vitamin D resistant rickets, multiple sclerosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Phosphorus is the second most plentiful mineral in your body (the first is calcium). Your body needs phosphorus for many tasks, such as filtering waste and repairing your tissues and cells. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, m...
  • There is some human evidence supporting the use of cranberry juice and cranberry supplements to prevent urinary tract infection (UTI), although most available studies are of poor quality. There are no clear dosing guidelines, but given the safety of cranberry, it may be reasonable to recommend the use of moderate amounts of cranberry juice cocktail to prevent UTI in non-chronically ill individuals. Cranberry has not been shown effective as a treatment for documented UTI. Although cranberry may be used as an adjunct therapy in some cases, given the proven efficacy of antibiotics, cranberry should not be considered a first line treatment. Cranberry has been investigated for numerous other medicinal uses, and promising areas of investigation include prevention of H . pylori infection, which causes gastrointestinal ulcers and dental plaque.
  • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is required for the synthesis of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine and for myelin formation. Pyridoxine deficiency in adults principally affects the peripheral nerves, skin, mucous membranes, and the blood cell system. In children, the central nervous system (CNS) is also affected. Deficiency can occur in people with uremia, alcoholism, cirrhosis, hyperthyroidism, malabsorption syndromes, congestive heart failure (CHF), and in those taking certain medications. Mild deficiency of vitamin B6 is common. Major sources of vitamin B6 include: cereal grains, legumes, vegetables (carrots, spinach, peas), potatoes, milk, cheese, eggs, fish, liver, meat, and flour. Pyridoxine is frequently used in combination with other B vitamins in vitamin B complex formulations.
  • The grapefruit was first described in the 1750s as the "forbidden fruit" of Barbados. It was introduced to Florida in the 1820s. Most grapefruit in the United States is still grown in Florida. Grapefruit juice has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes as well as to strengthen the immune system. Grapefruit is also added to cosmetics and hair care products as a fragrance. Grapefruit has been suggested as a treatment for several conditions, but there is currently insufficient scientific evidence to support the use of grapefruit for any medical disorder. The use of supplemental grapefruit pectin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and the use of grapefruit seed extract in atopic eczema warrants further scientific investigation before a strong recommendation can be made. There is conflicting research regarding the use of grapefruit for kidney stones. Grapefruit juice alters the way some drugs are broken down in the liver. Grapefruit may increase the effects of calcium channel blockers, benzodiazepines, immunosuppressants, and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.
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