Intracranial Hemorrhages symptoms
Intracranial Hemorrhages

Symptoms could include:

  • Seven out of 10 people in the U.S. have at least one headache per year, according to the American College of Physicians (ACP). And it is estimated that 45 million Americans suffer from chronic headaches. Headaches are an important cause of days m
    Source:HLCMS
  • Weakness is the feeling of body fatigue (tiredness). A person experiencing weakness may not be able to move that part of their body properly or they may experience tremors (uncontrollable movement or twitches) in the area of weakness. Some pe
    Source:HLCMS
  • Unconsciousness occurs when a person is suddenly unable to respond to stimuli and appears to be asleep. A person may be unconscious for a few seconds (as is the case with fainting) or for longer periods of time. People who become unconscious do
    Source:HLCMS
  • It is normal to have periods of low energy when one needs to rest and recuperate. However, if low energy persists and a person continually feels sluggish, disinterested in life, and has low energy, the situation should be investigated by a physician.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Muscle stiffness is when your muscles feel tight and contracted, rather than relaxed, when they're at rest. Muscle stiffness may limit your range of motion. Muscles may feel stiff after exercise, repetitive motion, or prolonged periods of inactivi...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Vomiting is an uncontrollable reflex that expels the contents of the stomach through the mouth. It is also called being sick, or throwing up. Nausea is the term used to describe the feeling that you might vomit, but are not actually vomiting. Bo
    Source:HLCMS
  • Numbness and tingling are unusual prickling sensations that can happen in any part of your body, but they are generally noticed in hands, feet, arms, and legs. Many things can cause the feeling of numbness and tingling, including sitting with you
    Source:HLCMS
  • Visual disturbances interfere with normal sight. The various types of visual disturbances may be caused by several conditions and disorders. Some are temporary and can be relieved with treatment. However, some can be permanent.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Alertness and being oriented to place and time are major characteristics of consciousness. Alertness means that you are able to respond appropriately to the people and things around you. You are oriented when you know who you are, where you are, w
    Source:HLCMS
  • Facial paralysis is loss of facial movement because of nerve damage. Your facial muscles droop or become weak. It usually happens on just one side of the face and is typically caused by: infection or inflammation of the facial nerve head
    Source:HLCMS
  • Ptosis is the medical term for a drooping eyelid. It refers only to the upper eyelid; it does not refer to lower eyelid sagging. Upper eyelid drooping can sometimes affect your vision if the drooping is severe. Ptosis is not a disease, but a sympt
    Source:HLCMS
  • Uncoordinated movement is also known as lack of coordination, coordination impairment, and loss of coordination. The medical term for this problem is ataxia. For most people, body movements are smooth, coordinated, and seamless. Such things as wal
    Source:HLCMS
  • Anisocoria is a condition where the pupil of one eye differs in size from the pupil of the other. Your pupil is the black circle in the center of your eye. The pupils of your eyes are usually the same size. Anisocoria has several causes and it
    Source:HLCMS
  • Seizures are changes in the brain's electrical activity. This can cause dramatic, noticeable symptoms or even no symptoms at all. The symptoms of a severe seizure are often widely recognized, including violent shaking and loss of control.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Coma, from the Greek word "koma," meaning deep sleep, is a state of extreme unresponsiveness, in which an individual exhibits no voluntary movement or behavior.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Blindness is the inability to see anything, even light. If you are partially blind, you have limited vision. Complete blindness means that you cannot see at all and are in total darkness. Legal blindness refers to vision that is highly compromised...
    Source:HLCMS
  • A tremor is an unintentional and uncontrollable rhythmic movement of one part of your body. A tremor can occur in any part of the body at any time. It is usually the result of a problem in the part of the brain that controls your muscles. Although...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Impaired sensation is often a signal that there something affecting a nerve or the nervous system. Changes in sensations are often subjective and difficult to describe, that is, experienced by the patient but difficult for the provider to diagnose and treat.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:October 31, 2007
  • Impaired sensation is the inability to perceive things accurately with the senses. Decreased sensations, tactile hypesthesia, hypoaethesia, limited sensation, reduced sensations. Impaired sensation is often a signal that there something affecting ...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Developmental reading disorder (DRD), more commonly called dyslexia, occurs when your brain has a hard time processing language. You might misread the letters in a word and/or have difficulty reading irregular or unfamiliar words. Dyslexia is the
    Source:HLCMS
  • Impaired taste means that your sense of taste is not functioning properly. Impaired taste can refer to the absence of taste or an altered sense, such as a metallic taste in the mouth. Most people experience impaired taste on a temporary and partia
    Source:HLCMS
  • Speech disorders can affect the way a person creates sounds. These sounds, of course, help us to form words and are necessary for communication with other people. Speech disorders can affect both adults and children. Certain voice disorders may al
    Source:HLCMS
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