Cushing Syndrome symptoms
Cushing Syndrome

Symptoms could include:

  • A hump behind the shoulder, also called a buffalo hump, can develop when fat gathers together behind your neck. This lump of fat is not necessarily a serious condition. Tumors, cysts, and other abnormal growths can also form on your shoulders, cre...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Excessive or unwanted hair that grows on a woman’s body and face is called hirsutism. All women have facial and body hair, but this hair is usually very fine and light in color. The main difference between normal hair—often called &ldq...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Unintentional weight gain occurs when you put on weight without increasing your consumption of food or liquid. It is often caused by: fluid retention abnormal growths constipation pregnancy Unintentional weight gain can be periodic, continuous, o...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Pain is a general term that describes uncomfortable sensations in the body, ranging from annoying to debilitating. Pain stems from activation of the nervous system and is highly subjective.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Acne (also called pimples or zits) occurs when dirt, bacteria, oil, or dead skin cells block your pores.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Impotence is the inability to hold an erection. As a man ages, testosterone decreases, causing changes in his sexuality. This includes loss of libido and impotence, which can result in the inability to gain or hold an erection. Certain medical con...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Statistics regarding impotence and erectile dysfunction are sketchy. As cited by Merck in the Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals, at least 10 to 20 million men in the United States alone suffer from erectile dysfunction. Experts believe th...
    Source:HLCMS
  • An estimated 15 to 30 million men are affected by erectile dysfunction and frequent ED can be a sign of a bigger medical problem that needs attention.
    Source:HLCMS
  • High blood pressure itself usually causes no symptoms, so it is easy to ignore. Left untreated, however, it can quietly damage your body for years. Eventually, it can lead to serious complications, such as heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidn...
    Source:HLCMS
  • High blood pressure (hypertension) increases your risk for heart attack, stroke, coronary heart disease, and other serious health problems. Left untreated, high blood pressure can damage blood vessels and vital organs.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Ademetionine is a form of the amino acid methionine. Low levels of folate or vitamin B12 can cause a drop in ademetionine. It is not found in foods.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Headaches are extremely common-almost everyone will experience at least one tension headache in their lives-but they usually go away without causing further problems. However, if you experience any of the situations below, you should see a doctor ...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Seven out of 10 people in the U.S. have at least one headache per year, according to the American College of Physicians (ACP). And it is estimated that 45 million Americans suffer from chronic headaches. Headaches are an important cause of days mi...
    Source:HLCMS
  • If you're seeing a doctor about headaches, here are five questions you may want to ask. If you suffer headaches frequently, medication overuse can be a big problem. If your body becomes accustomed to the medicine, you can experience rebound headac...
    Source:HLCMS
  • A headache is any kind of pain in the head, scalp, or neck. There are many different kinds of headaches, with many different causes.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Post-concussion syndrome, or post-concussive syndrome (PCS), refers to the lingering symptoms following a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury. Symptoms vary but include headache, dizziness, and depression.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Headaches can be caused by many factors, including genetics and dietary triggers. In women, fluctuating hormone levels are a major contributing factor in chronic headaches and menstrual migraines. Hormone levels change during the menstrual cycle,...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Being tired is the familiar aftermath of physical exertion, prolonged labor or lack of sleep. When does being tired become a symptom of a condition? Fatigue, malaise, lassitude, exhaustion are all subtle variations of the same subjective feelings of not having enough energy to meet the demands of one's life.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Fatigue is a term used to to describe the general overall feeling of tiredness and/or a lack of energy. Other words that are sometimes used in place of fatigue include exhaustion, weariness, and lethargy. According to the National Institutes of He...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Talking to your doctor about the nature of the pain is a critical step in the diagnostic and treatment processes.
    Source:HLCMS
  • When should you see a doctor about moderate back pain?
    Source:HLCMS
  • Back pain (medically referred to as "lumbago") is not a disease; it is a symptom. Back pain usually refers to a problem with one or more of the structures of the lower back such as ligaments, muscles, nerves, or the vertebral bodies (the bony stru...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Prevent back pain by protecting your spine and strengthening your back muscles. Learn ways to fight the onset of back pain.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Weakness is the feeling of body fatigue (tiredness). A person experiencing weakness may not be able to move that part of their body properly or they may experience tremors (uncontrollable movement or twitches) in the area of weakness. Some people ...
    Source:HLCMS
  • An overactive bladder causes the bladder to contract involuntarily and unpredictably
    Source:HLCMS
  • Frequent urination describes the need to urinate more often than you usually do. There is no clear definition of frequent. However, you may have frequent urination issues if the need to urinate creates challenges in your life, or if you develop a ...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Excessive urination volume, also called polyuria, occurs when you are urinating more than normal. Urine volume is considered excessive if it equals more than 2.5 liters per day. Exact “normal” urine volume depends on age and gender, bu...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Your body needs water to function properly. For example, water helps to regulate your body temperature, lubricate your joints, and remove waste from your body. Adequate daily water intake (several glasses) is very important. Furthermore, it is nor...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Bruises easily is when the capillaries (small blood vessels) beneath the skin break easily and frequently and leak blood into the surrounding tissue, creating discolorations. Easy bruising, increased tendency to bruise. Most of us get bruises from...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Most of us get bruises from bumping into something from time to time. Bruising sometimes increases with age, especially in women as the capillary walls become more fragile and the skin becomes thin.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
  • Amenorrhea is the term for a woman missing a monthly menstrual period. Not having a period during pregnancy or after menopause is normal. But missing periods at any other time can be a symptom of a medical issue.
    Source:HLCMS
  • When men become sexually aroused, a number of hormones, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels all work in conjunction with one another to signal an erection. Nerve signals, sent from the brain to the penis, stimulate muscles to relax. This, in turn, ...
    Source:HLCMS
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