ascorbic acid (generic name)

a vitamin - treats Urinary tract infection, Complex regional pain syndrome, Bleeding stomach ulcers caused by aspirin, Vaginitis, Stroke preven...
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Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Acne, age-related macular degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, anemia, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, bedsores, blood vessel disorders (capillary fragility), bronchitis, cervical dysplasia, Chediak-Higaski syndrome, chronic venous insufficiency, cognitive function, constipation, cystic fibrosis, dental cavities, dental conditions (discoloration of tooth enamel), depression, dermatitis, detoxification (histamine), diabetes, eye disorders, furunculosis (recurrent boils), gallbladder disease, gastric ulcer, hay fever, heavy metal/lead toxicity (mercury elimination), high blood pressure, high cholesterol, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, immune stimulation, infertility, jellyfish stings, male infertility, melasma, menorrhagia, muscle soreness, nitroglycerin activity prolongation (nitrate tolerance prevention), osteoporosis, reduction of levodopa side effects, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, skin conditions (wrinkles), stomach ulcers, tuberculosis, urine acidification, wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

Recommended daily intake by the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board of the institute of Medicine for men older than 18 years-old is 90 milligrams per day; for women older than 18 years-old is 75 milligrams per day; for pregnant women older than 18 years-old is 85 milligrams per day; for breastfeeding women older than 18 years-old is 120 milligrams per day. Recently, some experts have questioned whether the recommended daily intake should be raised. Others have recommended higher intake in some individuals, such as smokers, in whom an additional 35 milligrams per day has been recommended by some.

Upper limit of intake (UL) should not exceed 2,000 milligrams per day in men or women older than 18 years old (including pregnant or breastfeeding women).

Vitamin C administered by mouth or injection is effective for curing scurvy. In adults, 100-250 milligrams by mouth four times daily for one week is generally sufficient to improve symptoms and replenish body vitamin C stores. Some experts have recommended 1-2 grams per day for two days followed by 500 milligrams per day for one week. Symptoms should begin to improve within 24-48 hours, with resolution within seven days. Treatment should be under strict medical supervision. For asymptomatic vitamin C deficiency, lower daily doses may be used.

Children (under 18 years old)

Adequate Intakes (AIs) and U.S. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for infants ages 0-6 months-old is 40 milligrams per day, and for infants 7-12 months old is 50 milligrams per day. The DRI for children 1-3 years old is 15 milligrams per day; for 4-8 years old is 25 milligrams per day; for 9-13 years old is 45 milligrams per day; for 14-18 year old males is 75 milligrams per day; for 14-18 year-old females is 65 milligrams per day; for 14-18 year-old pregnant females is 80 milligrams per day; for 14-18 year-old breastfeeding females is 115 milligrams per day. Recently, some experts have questioned whether recommended daily intakes should be raised.

Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL) have not been determined for infants ages 0-12 months, and vitamin C in this group should only be derived from food intake to avoid excess doses. The UL for children ages 1-3 years old is 400 milligrams per day; the UL for ages 4-8 years old is 650 milligrams per day; the UL for ages 9-13 years-old is 1,200 milligrams per day; the UL for ages 14-18 years old is 1,000 milligrams per day (including pregnant or breastfeeding females).

For scurvy/deficiency in children, 100-300 milligrams per day by mouth in divided doses for two weeks has been used. Older or larger children may require doses closer to adult recommendations. If vitamin C is not available, orange juice may be used for infantile scurvy. Symptoms should begin to improve within 24-48 hours, with resolution within seven days. Treatment should be under strict medical supervision. For asymptomatic vitamin C deficiency, lower daily doses may be used.

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