Soy Protein (generic name)

treats Diarrhea in adults, Cognitive function, Endocrine disorders, Cardiac ischemia, Type 2 diabetes, Prostate cancer prevention, Kidney disea...
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Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Coumestrol, daidzein, edamame, frijol de soya, genistein, greater bean, haba soya, hydrolyzed soy protein, isoflavone, isoflavonoid, legume, natto, phytoestrogen, plant estrogen, shoyu, soja, sojabohne, soya, soya protein, soybean, soy fiber, soy food, soy product, soy protein, Ta-tou, texturized vegetable protein.

Background

Soy is a subtropical plant native to southeastern Asia. This member of the pea family (Fabaceae) grows from 1-5 feet tall and forms clusters of 3-5 pods that each contain 2-4 beans. Soy has been a dietary staple in Asian countries for at least 5,000 years. During the Chou dynasty in China (1134-246 B.C.), fermentation techniques were discovered that allowed soy to be prepared in more easily digestible forms such as tempeh, miso, and tamari soy sauce. Tofu was invented in 2nd Century China.

Soy was introduced to Europe in the 1700s and to the United States in the 1800s. Large-scale soybean cultivation began in the United States during World War II. Currently, Midwestern U.S. farmers produce about half of the world's supply of soybeans.

Soy and components of soy called "isoflavones" have been studied for many health conditions. Isoflavones (such as genistein) are believed to have estrogen-like effects in the body, and as a result, they are sometimes called "phytoestrogens." In laboratory studies, it is not clear if isoflavones stimulate or block the effects of estrogen or both (acting as "mixed receptor agonists/antagonists").

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Dietary source of protein: Soy products, such as tofu, are high in protein and are an acceptable source of dietary protein.
Grade: A

High cholesterol: Numerous human studies report that adding soy protein to the diet can moderately decrease blood levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein ("bad" cholesterol). Small reductions in triglycerides may also occur, while high-density lipoprotein ("good" cholesterol) does not seem to be significantly altered. Some scientists have proposed that specific components of soybean, such as the isoflavones genistein and daidzein, may be responsible for the cholesterol-lowering properties of soy. However, this has not been clearly demonstrated in research and remains controversial. It is not known if products containing isolated soy isoflavones have the same effects as regular dietary intake of soy protein. Dietary soy protein has not been proven to affect long-term cardiovascular outcomes, such as heart attack or stroke.
Grade: A

Diarrhea (acute) in infants and young children: Numerous studies report that infants and young children (2-36 months old) with diarrhea who are fed soy formulas experience fewer daily bowel movements and fewer days of diarrhea. This research suggests that soy has benefits over other types of formula, including cow milk-based solutions. The addition of soy fiber to soy formula may increase the effectiveness. Better quality research is needed before a strong recommendation can be made. Parents are advised to speak with qualified healthcare providers if their infants experience prolonged diarrhea, become dehydrated, develop signs of infections (such as fever), or have blood in the stool. A healthcare provider should be consulted for current breastfeeding recommendations and to suggest long-term formulas that provide enough nutrition.
Grade: B

Menopausal symptoms: Overall, evidence suggests that soy products containing isoflavones may help reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes.
Grade: B

Breast cancer prevention: Several large population studies have asked women about their eating habits and reported that higher soy intake (such as dietary tofu) is associated with a decreased risk of developing breast cancer. However, other research suggests that soy does not have this effect. Until better research is available, it remains unclear if dietary soy or soy isoflavone supplements increase or decrease the risk of breast cancer.
Grade: C

Cancer treatment: Genistein, an isoflavone found in soy, has been found in laboratory and animal studies to have anti-cancer effects, such as blocking new blood vessel growth (anti-angiogenesis), acting as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (a mechanism of many new cancer treatments), or causing cancer cell death (apoptosis). In contrast, genistein has also been reported toincreasethe growth of pancreas tumor cells in laboratory research. Until reliable human research is available, it remains unclear if dietary soy or soy isoflavone supplements are beneficial, harmful, or neutral in cancer patients.
Grade: C

Cardiovascular disease: Dietary soy protein has not been shown to affect long-term cardiovascular outcomes, such as heart attack or stroke. Research does suggest cholesterol-lowering effects of dietary soy, which in theory, may reduce the risk of heart problems. Soy has also been studied for blood pressure-lowering and blood sugar-reducing properties in people with type 2 diabetes, although the evidence is not definitive in these areas. Further investigation is needed before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Cardiac ischemia: Cardiac ischemia occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. In women with suspected cardiac ischemia, high levels of the soy isoflavone genistein have been associated with blood vessel problems. Until more research is done, it is unknown if soy plays a role in cardiac ischemia.
Grade: C

Cognitive function: It is unclear if soy isoflavone supplementation in postmenopausal women can improve cognitive function. Results from studies are mixed.
Grade: C

Colon cancer prevention: There is not enough scientific evidence to determine if dietary intake of soy affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Study results are mixed, and more research is needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Crohn's disease: Due to limited human research, there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against the use of soy as a way to prevent Crohn's disease. Further research is needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Cyclical breast pain: It has been theorized that the "phytoestrogens" (plant-based compounds with weak estrogen-like properties) in soy may be beneficial to premenopausal women with cyclical breast pain. However, due to limited human research, there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against the use of dietary soy protein as a therapy for this condition.
Grade: C

Diarrhea in adults: Due to limited human study, there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against the use of soy-polysaccharide/fiber in the treatment of diarrhea. Further research is needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Endocrine disorders (metabolic syndrome): Soy nuts may help reduce inflammation, improve blood sugar control, and improve lipid profiles in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. More research is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Endometrial cancer prevention: There is not enough scientific evidence to determine if dietary intake of soy affects the risk of developing endometrial cancer.
Grade: C

Exercise capacity improvement (spinal cord injury patients): Soy appears to be less effective than whey protein at improving caloric expenditure and the distance and length of time that patients with spinal cord injuries are able to walk before feeling tired. More research is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Gallstones (cholelithiasis): Due to limited human research, there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against the use of soy as a therapy in cholelithiasis. Further research is needed before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

High blood pressure: There is limited human research on the effects of dietary soy on blood pressure. Some research suggests that substituting soy nuts for non-soy protein may help improve blood pressure. Further research is needed before a firm recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Kidney disease (chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, proteinuria): Due to limited human study, there is not enough evidence to recommend for or against the use of soy in the treatment of kidney diseases, such as nephrotic syndrome. People with kidney disease should speak with their healthcare providers about the recommended amounts of dietary protein because soy is a high-protein food.
Grade: C

Menstrual migraine: A phytoestrogen combination may help prevent menstrual migraine attacks. Further research is needed before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Obesity/weight reduction: Some research suggests that soy might be as effective as skim milk and more effective than a low-calorie diet alone in reducing weight. Other research has reported conflicting results. Further research is needed before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Osteoporosis, post-menopausal bone loss: It has been theorized that "phytoestrogens in soy" (such as isoflavones) may increase bone mineral density in post-menopausal women and reduce the risk of fractures. However, more research is needed before a conclusion can be made.
Grade: C

Prostate cancer prevention: Early research has tested the effects of dietary soy intake on prostate cancer development in humans, but the results have not been conclusive. Better research is needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Skin aging: It is unclear if aglycones, a form of soy isoflavone, can improve aged skin in middle-aged women when it is taken by mouth. More research is needed.
Grade: C

Skin damage caused by the sun: A soy moisturizing cream may help improve signs of sun damage, including discoloration, blotchiness, dullness, fine lines, and overall texture. Because the cream contained other ingredients besides soy, more research with soy alone is needed.
Grade: C

Stomach cancer: Early research suggests that intake of soy products may be associated with a reduced risk of death from stomach cancer. Further investigation is needed before a conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: C

Thyroid disorders: Early research suggests that soy supplements do not affect thyroid function. More research is needed.
Grade: C

Tuberculosis: It has been suggested that soy may be beneficial for tuberculosis when taken with standard medications. According to early research, soy may improve the process of detoxification, have positive effects on the liver, reduce cell damage, and decrease inflammation. Therefore, soy supplements may allow patients to safely take higher doses of antimicrobial drugs that are used to treat tuberculosis.
Grade: C

Type 2 diabetes: Several small studies have examined the effects of soy products on blood sugar levels in people with type 2 ("adult-onset") diabetes. Results are mixed, with some research reporting decreased blood glucose levels and other trials noting no effects. Overall, research in this area is not well designed or reported, and better information is needed.
Grade: C

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