Rutin (generic name)

treats Varicose veins, Venous hypertension, Retinal vein occlusion, Edema, Thrombosis, Skin conditions, Schizophrenia, Microangiopathy, Retinop...
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Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides or plants that rutin is commonly found in, such as rue, tobacco or buckwheat. One case of leg dermatitis was noted in an elderly patient while taking O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides.

Side Effects and Warnings

Rutins, oxerutins and troxerutins have been used effectively and safely in several clinical and equivalence trials. Numerous reports have reported no adverse side effects with rutin treatment. Laboratory findings were noted as unchanged. Few adverse effects have been reported, most of which were mild or transient. Rutin is possibly unsafe when taken in very high doses for long periods of time.

Adverse effects reported while taking O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides have included monocytosis, eosinophilia (increased white blood cell count), deep vein thrombosis, superficial thrombophlebitis, skin rash, hair loss, gastritis (stomach inflammation), vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, dry mouth, abdominal pain, headache, acute brain syndrome, dizziness, sleeping problems, tiredness, swelling, muscle stiffness, and upper respiratory tract infection.

Use cautiously in elderly patients; most adverse effects have been reported in elderly populations.

Use cautiously in individuals with skin conditions; dermatitis has been noted with use.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Rutin supplements have been safely used during pregnancy to treat venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and varicose veins. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, before taking rutin to make sure that the benefits of rutin supplementation outweigh the risks in each individual. Rutin is not recommended in breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Rutin is often used in combination with coumarin. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that my increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Phlogenzym® tablets (a combination product containing rutin) have been used with antibiotics. In theory, rutin should be safe to combine with antibiotics.

Theoretically, rutin may have additive effects when used in combination with benzopyrones, anti-edema drugs, Wobenzym® (contains rutin), Dicynone® or Reparil®.

Intramuscular administration of the fixed combination of troxerutin and carbazochrome has been well-tolerated in improving hemorrhoidal and post-surgical symptoms during the five days following surgery. Injections should only be given under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist.

Theoretically, rutin may have additive effects when used in combination with diuretics. Caution is advised.

Taking hydroxyethylrutoside by mouth may counteract docetaxel-fluid retention.

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in combination with rutin may reduce ethane and MDA concentrations, and increase GSH; this combination may be efficient in protecting the lungs of patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

High doses of O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides may counteract the unwanted activity of birth control pills on venous function.

Theoretically, rutin may competitively inhibit action of quinolone antibiotics, which are used in the treatment of malaria.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Oxerutins may have an additive effect when used concomitantly with horse chestnut extract.

Rutosid enzyme is often used in combination with bromelain and trypsin. Based on early evidence, troxerutin appears safe for use with Gingko bilobo for the treatment of hemorrhoids.

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in combination with rutin may reduce ethane and MDA concentrations and increase GSH; this combination may be efficient in protecting the lungs of patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

Rutin supplements may have an additive effect with quercetin supplements, as quercetin is a flavonoid yielded from rutin.

Theoretically, rutin may increase absorption of vitamin C. Rutin is found in buckwheat herb tea and thus may have an additive effect when taken concomitantly.

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