Dicalcium phosphate (generic name)

treats Laxative/bowel preparation for procedures, Burns, Exercise performance, Hypercalcemia, Bone density, Total parenteral nutrition, Refeedi...
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Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

The National Academy of Sciences has recommended 700 milligrams of phosphorus per day in adults ages 18 years and older, including pregnant or breastfeeding women.

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for adults ages 19-70 years old is 4 grams per day; for adults 70 years and older the UL is 3 grams per day. The recommended UL in pregnant women is 3.5 grams per day, and in breastfeeding women is 4 grams per day. Phosphate salts should not be administered to patients with hyperphosphatemia and should be used cautiously in those with impaired kidney function.

Doses typically range from 1-3 grams of phosphorous (as a phosphate salt (sodium phosphate or potassium phosphate) or elemental phosphate) per day by mouth for the treatment of calcium oxalate kidney stones, hypercalcemia, or hypophosphatemia. Doses are usually divided and taken throughout the day.

Fleet Enema (118 milliliters) can be used as a laxative when administered rectally. It should be administered as a single daily dose. Laxatives should not generally be used for more than one week. 4-8 grams of sodium phosphate dissolved in water has also been used as a saline laxative (should be taken with plenty of water).

Intravenous phosphate 50 millimoles (sodium 81 millimoles, potassium 9.5 millimoles) over 24 hours has been used during refeeding syndrome when serum phosphate falls below 0.5 millimoles per liter. Phosphate blood levels should be closely followed.

Children (younger than 18 years)

The recommended adequate intake in infants 0-6 months old is 100 milligrams per day (additional phosphorus may be added to infant formulas); the recommended adequate intake in infants 7-12 months old is 275 milligrams per day; the recommended daily intake in children ages 1-3 years old is 460 milligrams per day; the recommended daily intake in children ages 4-8 years old is 500 milligrams per day; the recommended daily intake in children ages 9-18 years old is 1,250 milligrams per day (including pregnant or breastfeeding females).

The Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for infants aged 0-12 months old is not clearly established and the source of intake should be from food and formula only; for children 1-8 years old the UL is 3 grams per day; for children 9-18 years old the UL is 4 grams per day.

Children under 12 years of age should not receive an adult size Fleet Enema. Children 2 to 12 years of age may receive a Fleet Ready-To-Use Enema for children in a single daily dose (2 fluid ounces). Laxatives should not generally be used for more than one week.

Children 5 to 10 years old may receive 5 milliliters Fleet Phospho-soda and should not exceed 10 milliliters in a 24-hour period. Children between 10 to 12 years old may receive 10 milliliters and should not exceed 20 milliliters in a 24-hour period. Children over 12 years old may receive a dose of 20 milliliters and should not exceed 45 milliliters in a 24-hour period. Do not administer to children under five years of age.

Children may also receive intravenous preparations, which should be given under the supervision of a licensed healthcare professional.

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