Perilla frutescens (generic name)

treats Asthma, Allergies, and Aphthous stomatitis
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Average Ratings

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for perilla. Traditionally, a tea (boiling water to ¼ cup dry herb, steep 10 to 15 minutes), consumed throughout the day has been used for colds, flu, sore throat, and congestion. For asthma, perilla seed oil for four weeks has been used. For seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, Perilla frutescens enriched with rosmarinic acid (200 milligrams or 50 milligrams) for three weeks has been used. Perilla has also been boiled and the steam has been inhaled to clear the sinuses.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for perilla in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to perilla. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from Perilla frutescens has been documented.

Side Effects and Warnings

Perilla used in recommended doses is considered to be safe and well tolerated. In one study, patients reported no adverse events and no significant abnormalities were detected in routine blood tests. However, occupational allergic contact dermatitis from Perilla frutescens has been documented.

Use commercial perilla oil cautiously in patients with cancer, due to a mutagen formed in the oil, from omega-3 fatty acids.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Perilla is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Perilla frutescens may contain sedative constituents. Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

Although not well studied in humans, perilla may lower HDL-cholesterol levels. Caution is advised in patients with high cholesterol or those taking any cholesterol-lowering agents.

Theoretically, perilla may suppress indomethacin-induced effects, due to a change in fatty acid and eicosanoid status. Caution is advised in patients taking indomethacin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Perilla frutescens may contain sedative constituents, and may interact with other herbs that have sedative properties. Drowsiness or sedation may occur. Use caution if driving or operating heavy machinery.

Theoretically, the results from an animal study suggest that the combination of perilla and beta-carotene may reduce the risk of colon cancer.

Theoretically, perilla may lower HDL-cholesterol levels. Caution is advised in patients with high cholesterol or those taking any cholesterol-lowering agents, such as red yeast rice.

Theoretically, use of fish oil or omega-3 fatty acid sources (flax oil, walnut oil, soybean oil) and perilla oil would increase omega-3 fatty acid status of blood and tissues to a greater effect than either alone. Caution is advised.

Attribution

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Julie Conquer, PhD (RGB Consulting); Brian Szczechowski, PharmD (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

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