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milk thistle (generic name)

an herbal product - treats Cirrhosis, Amanita phalloides mushroom poisoning, High cholesterol, Chronic hepatitis, Liver damage from drugs or to...
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Average Ratings

Alternate Title

Silymarin

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Bull thistle, cardo blanco, Cardui mariae fructus, Cardui mariae herba, Cardum marianum L., Carduus marianus L., Chardon-Marie, emetic root, flavonolignans, Frauendistel, Fructus Silybi mariae, fruit de chardon Marie, heal thistle, holy thistle, isosilibinin, isosilybin, kanger, kocakavkas, kuub, lady's thistle, Legalon®, Marian thistle, mariana mariana, Mariendistel, Marienkrörner, Mary thistle, mild thistle, milk ipecac, natursil, natursilum, Our Lady's thistle, pig leaves, royal thistle, shui fei ji, silidianin, Silybi mariae fructus, silybin, silybinin, Silybum marianum, silychristin, silymarin, snake milk, sow thistle, St. Mary's thistle, thisylin, Venue thistle, variegated thistle, wild artichoke.

Background

Milk thistle has been used medicinally for over 2,000 years, most commonly for the treatment of liver and gallbladder disorders. A flavonoid complex called silymarin can be extracted from the seeds of milk thistle and is believed to be the biologically active component. The terms "milk thistle" and "silymarin" are often used interchangeably.

Milk thistle products are popular in Europe and the United States for various types of liver disease. Although numerous human trials have been published, most studies have not been well designed or reported.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Chronic hepatitis (liver inflammation): Several studies of oral milk thistle for hepatitis caused by viruses or alcohol report improvements in liver tests. However, most studies have been small and poorly designed. More research is needed before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: B

Cirrhosis: Multiple studies from Europe suggest benefits of oral milk thistle for cirrhosis. In experiments up to five years long, milk thistle has improved liver function and decreased the number of deaths that occur in cirrhotic patients. Although these results are promising, most studies have been poorly designed. Better research is necessary before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: B

Acute viral hepatitis: Research on milk thistle for acute viral hepatitis has not provided clear results, and milk thistle cannot be recommended for this potentially life-threatening condition.
Grade: C

Amanita phalloides mushroom poisoning: Milk thistle has been used traditionally to treatAmanita phalloidesmushroom poisoning. However, there are not enough reliable studies in humans to support this use of milk thistle.
Grade: C

Cancer: There are early reports from laboratory experiments that the chemicals silymarin and silibinin in milk thistle reduce the growth of human breast, cervical, and prostate cancer cells. There is also one report of a patient with liver cancer who improved following treatment with milk thistle. However, this research is too early to draw a firm conclusion, and effects have not been shown in high-quality human trials.
Grade: C

Diabetes (in patients with cirrhosis): A small number of studies suggest possible improvements of blood sugar control in cirrhotic patients with diabetes. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend milk thistle for this use.
Grade: C

High cholesterol: Although animal and laboratory research suggests cholesterol-lowering effects of milk thistle, human studies have provided unclear results. Further studies are necessary before a firm recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Liver damage from drugs or toxins: Several studies suggest possible benefits of milk thistle to treat or prevent liver damage caused by drugs or toxic chemicals. Results of this research are not clear, and most studies have been poorly designed. Therefore, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend milk thistle for this use.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

Silymarin (Legalon®) 230-600 milligrams per day divided into two to three doses has been studied.

Silipide® (IdB 1016) 160-480 milligrams per day in silybin equivalents has also been studied.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is not enough scientific data to recommend milk thistle for use in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

People with allergies to plants in the aster family (Compositae, Asteraceae) or to daisies, artichokes, common thistle, kiwi, or to any of milk thistle's constituents (silibinin, silychistin, silydianin, silymonin, siliandrin) may have allergic reactions to milk thistle. Anaphylactic shock (a severe allergic reaction) from milk thistle tea or tablets has been reported in several patients. Overall, silymarin has a good safety record with rare case reports of gastrointestinal disturbances and allergic skin rashes published.

Side Effects and Warnings

Milk thistle appears to be well tolerated in recommended doses for up to six years. Some patients in studies have experienced stomach upset, headache, and itching. There are rare reports of appetite loss, gas, heartburn, diarrhea, joint pain, and impotence with milk thistle use. One person experienced sweating, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting, weakness, and collapse after taking milk thistle. This reaction may have been due to an allergic reaction, and improved after 24 hours. High liver enzyme levels in one person taking milk thistle returned to normal after the person stopped taking the herb.

In theory, milk thistle may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugars. Serum glucose levels may need to be monitored by a healthcare provider, and medication adjustments may be necessary.

Theoretically, because milk thistle plant extract might have estrogenic effects, women with hormone sensitive conditions should avoid milk thistle above ground parts. Some of these conditions include breast, uterine, and ovarian cancer, endometriosis, and uterine fibroids. The more commonly used milk thistle seed extracts are not known to have estrogenic effects.

Exacerbation of hemochromatosis has been associated with ingestion of milk thistle.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Milk thistle has been used historically to improve breast milk flow, and two brief studies of milk thistle in pregnant women reported no side effects. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to support the safe use of milk thistle during pregnancy or breastfeeding at this time.

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