(generic name)

treats Iron deficiency and Cholera
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Based on laboratory studies, lime may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system. As a result, the levels of drugs metabolized via CYP450 may be affected in the blood, and may cause potentially serious adverse reactions. Some drugs that may be affected are benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers, some HIV antivirals, some HMG CoA reductase inhibitors and some macrolide antibiotics.

Based on laboratory study, fresh lime juice in concentrations above 5% may increase the transport of digoxin across cell membranes. As a result, the levels of digoxin may be affected in the blood, and may cause altered effects or potentially serious adverse reactions, including overdose.

Concentrations of lime juice may enhance the absorption of [(14)C]-mannitol; this could result in excessive diuresis and lead to electrolyte abnormalities or kidney failure. Caution is advised.

Theoretically, use of lime oil with photosensitizing agents may increase the risk of phototoxicity.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

Based on laboratory study, lime may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system. As a result, use may cause the levels of other herbs or supplements to be too high or too low in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system.

Based on laboratory and human study, there is conflicting evidence as to whether ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in limeade affects iron absorption. Preliminary study shows that limeade may increase iron absorption, but human study did not show any therapeutic effect in iron deficient women.

Based on laboratory study, a 30% concentration of lime juice may enhance the absorption of [(14)C]-mannitol; this could result in excessive diuresis, and lead to electrolyte abnormalities or renal failure.

Theoretically, use of lime oil with photosensitizing agents may increase the risk of phototoxicity.

Theoretically, concomitant use of herbs and supplements containing psoralens might potentiate effects and adverse reactions. Caution is advised.

Attribution

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Ashley Brigham, PharmD (Northeastern University); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Ah Reum Sim, PharmD (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Denise Wong, PharmD (Northeastern University).

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