Epimedium (generic name)

treats Atherosclerosis and Sexual dysfunction
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Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Abortion, adrenal cortex function (atrophy), aging, allergy/hay fever, Alzheimer's disease, amenorrhea (absence of menstruation), analgesia, angina, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antitussive (preventing or relieving cough), antiviral, aphrodisiac, asthma, cancer, chronic bronchitis, chronic hepatitis, cognitive improvement, cold prevention, coronary heart disease, erectile dysfunction, exercise performance enhancement, expectorant, fatigue, hepatoprotection, HIV/AIDS, hyperhomocysteinemia, hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol), hypertension (high blood pressure), immunosuppression, impotence, infertility, kidney protection, leukopenia, memory, menopause, muscle ache, myocarditis/endocarditis, neurasthenia, osteoporosis, ovulation disorders, paralysis, platelet aggregation inhibition, prostate cancer, quality of life, renal failure (insufficiency), respiratory distress, thyroid disorders, tonic, viral infection (polio), yang insufficiency.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for horny goat weed. In general, 6-15 grams daily has been used. A decoction (5 grams of horny goat weed simmered in 250 milliliters of water for 10-15 minutes) three times daily has been used. A similar amount of horny goat weed in the form of granules (freeze-dried grains made from decocted herb), or powdered herb in capsules has been used. Also, 5 milliliters of 20% tincture three times daily before meals has been used.

For angina pectoris, chronic bronchitis, and neurasthenia, 4-6 0.3-gram tablets (equivalent to 2.7 gram of raw material in each tablet), twice daily for one month have been used; administration has been stopped for 7-10 days and then resumed in a second series, if required.

Intramuscular injections have also been used in ampoules of 2 milliliters (equivalent to 1 gram of raw material). Injections should only be given under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for horny goat weed in children, and use is not recommended.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to horny goat weed (Epimedium grandiflorum).

Side Effects and Warnings

In general, horny goat weed is well tolerated. Based on long-term traditional use in Chinese culture, horny goat weed is possibly safe when taken by mouth at recommended doses. However, avoid use of horny goat weed in patients with fire from yin deficiency (people with too much "yang" or heat, masculinity, and activity, based on Chinese philosophy).

Gastrointestinal complaints, such as nausea, vomiting and dryness of the mouth, are the most common side effects. Other side effects may include tachyarrhythmia (disturbance in the regular rhythm of the heartbeat), fever, or hypomania (a mild form of mania). Horny goat weed may also dilate coronary vessels and lower blood pressure. Long-term use may cause aggressiveness, irritability, or respiratory arrest. Extended use of Japanese Epimedium taken by mouth may result in nosebleed, exaggeration of tendon reflexes to the point of spasm, or dizziness. Certain compounds isolated from Epimedium davidii may affect immune responses in some individuals. Use cautiously in patients with immune function disorders due to the potential for worsening symptoms.

Based on these side effects, horny goat weed is possibly unsafe when used in patients with tachyarrhythmia, decreased blood pressure, frequent nosebleeds, musculoskeletal disorders, bipolar disorder, immune function disorders, homocysteine disorders, thyroid disorders, respiratory distress, hormone-sensitive conditions, or cardiovascular disease.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Horny goat weed is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Horny goat weed may increase testosterone and estrogen levels in the body.

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