Humulus lupulus (generic name)

treats Sedation, Menopausal symptoms, Insomnia/sleep quality, and Rheumatic diseases
Table of Contents
powered by healthline

Average Ratings

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

2-methy-3-butene-2-ol, 8-PN, 8-prenylnaringenin, beer, Cannabaceae (family), colupulone, common hops, European hops, hop, hop strobile, Hopfen (German), houblon (French), humulon, humulus, Humulus lupulus, iso-alpha-acids, lupulin, lupulus, Lupuli strobulus, prenylated 2´-hydroxychalcones, prenylflavonoids, spent hops, xanthohumol, Ze 91019.

Background

The hop is a member of the Cannabaceae family, traditionally used for relaxation, sedation, and to treat insomnia. A number of methodologically weak human trials have investigated hops in combination with valerian (Valeriana officinalis) for the treatment of sleep disturbances, and several animal studies have examined the sedative properties of hops alone. However, the results of these studies are equivocal, and there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend hops alone or in combination for any medical condition.

Hops are also sometimes found in combination products with passionflower (Passiflora incarnata), skullcap (potentially damaging to the liver), or with a high percentage of alcohol (up to 70% grain alcohol), confounding the association between the herb and possible sedative or hypnotic effects.

Hops contain phytoestrogens that may possess estrogen receptor agonist or antagonist properties with unclear effects on hormone-sensitive conditions, such as breast, uterine, cervical, or prostate cancer or endometriosis.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Insomnia/sleep quality: Animal studies report that hops may have sedative and sleep-enhancing (hypnotic) effects. However, little human research has evaluated the effects of hops on sleep quality. Further study is needed in this area before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Menopausal symptoms: When used in combination with other products, hops may help alleviate menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and difficulty sleeping, because it has estrogen-like activity. However, until more well-designed studies are performed, a strong recommendation cannot be made.
Grade: C

Rheumatic diseases: Early clinical research suggests that a combination formula containing hops may help reduce symptoms of rheumatic diseases, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. However, well-designed human trials using hops alone are needed to determine if these positive effects are specifically the result of hops.
Grade: C

Sedation: Hops have been used traditionally as a sedative, for relaxation and reduction of anxiety. Although some animal studies suggest possible sedative properties, there is limited human research in this area. Better studies are needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Analgesic, antidepressant, antibacterial (antimycobacterial), antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antiviral (anti-HCV, anti-Rhino, anti-herpes virus), anxiety, aphrodisiac, appetite stimulant, asbestosis, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), atopic dermatitis, breast enhancer, cancer (breast, uterine, cervical, prostate), Crohn's disease, depression, diabetes, digestion, dysentery, dyspepsia, Epstein-Barr virus, estrogen-like activity, heartburn, high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), kidney disorders, leprosy, leukemia (HL-60 ), mood disturbances, muscle spasm, nervous disorders, obesity, osteoporosis, pain, parasites and worms, restlessness, skin ulcers (topical), spine problems (scoliosis), tuberculosis.
Page: 1 2 3 4 Next >
Licensed from
Top of page
General Drug Tools
General Drug Tools view all tools
Tools for
Healthy Living
Tools for Healthy Living view all tools
Search Tools
Search Tools view all tools
Insurance Plan Tools
Insurance Plan Tools view all tools

What is a reference number?

When you register on this site, you are assigned a reference number. This number contains your profile information and helps UnitedHealthcare identify you when you come back to the site.

If you searched for a plan on this site in a previous session, you might already have a reference number. This number will contain any information you saved about plans and prescription drugs. To use that reference number, click on the "Change or view saved information" link below.

You can retrieve information from previous visits to this site, such as saved drug lists and Plan Selector information.