honey (generic name)

treats Burns, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Wound healing, Fournier's gangrene, Rhinoconjunctivitis, Leg ulcers, Radiation mucositis, Skin graft he...
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Theoretically, honey used in combination with other antibiotics may have an additive effect. Caution is advised.

Although not well studied in humans, honey may interact with carbamazepine. Patients taking anticonvulsants should use honey with caution.

Nigerian Citrus sinensis Osbeck honey reduces peak blood alcohol (ethanol) levels. Interactions with alcohol are possible, and patients should consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist.

Although honey has been investigated in the treatment of diabetes and lowering plasma glucose, honey is composed of sugars (mainly fructose and glucose). Based on its composition, honey may increase blood sugar when taken orally, and caution is advised in patients taking antidiabetic agents.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

Theoretically, honey used in combination with other antibiotics may have an additive effect. Caution is advised.

Although honey has been investigated in the treatment of diabetes and lowering plasma glucose, honey is composed of sugars (mainly fructose and glucose). Based on its composition, honey may increase blood sugar when taken orally, and caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that alter blood sugar.

Attribution

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Heather Boon, B.Sc.Phm, PhD, (University of Toronto); Julie Conquer, PhD (RGB Consulting); Catherine DeFranco Kirkwood, MPH, CCCJS-MAC (MD Anderson Cancer Center); Benjamin Kligler, M.D., M.P.H. (Beth Israel Center for Health and Healing); Jennifer McDaniel, BA, (Northeastern University); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Chris Tonelli, MA (Emmanuel College); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Jen Woods, BA (Northeastern University).

Bibliography

DISCLAIMER: Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

Abenavoli FM, Corelli R. Honey therapy. Ann.Plast.Surg. 2004;52(6):627.

Al Waili NS. Topical honey application vs. acyclovir for the treatment of recurrent herpes simplex lesions. Med.Sci.Monit. 2004;10(8):MT94-MT98.

Bose B. Honey or sugar in treatment of infected wounds? Lancet 4-24-1982;1(8278):963.

Hou YC, Ching H, Chao PD, et al. Effects of glucose, fructose and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde on the presystemic metabolism and absorption of glycyrrhizin in rabbits. J.Pharm.Pharmacol. 2005;57(2):247-251.

Kaufmann A, Kaenzig A. Contamination of honey by the herbicide asulam and its antibacterial active metabolite sulfanilamide. Food Addit.Contam 2004;21(6):564-571.

Keast-Butler J. Honey for necrotic malignant breast ulcers. Lancet 10-11-1980;2(8198):809.

Molan PC, Betts JA. Clinical usage of honey as a wound dressing: an update. J.Wound.Care 2004;13(9):353-356.

Postmes T, van den Bogaard AE, Hazen M. Honey for wounds, ulcers, and skin graft preservation. Lancet 3-20-1993;341(8847):756-757.

Schumacher HH. Use of medical honey in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers after split-skin grafting. J.Wound.Care 2004;13(10):451-452.

Staunton CJ, Halliday LC, Garcia KD. The use of honey as a topical dressing to treat a large, devitalized wound in a stumptail macaque (Macaca arctoides). Contemp.Top Lab Anim Sci. 2005;44(4):43-45.

Subrahmanyam M. A prospective randomised clinical and histological study of superficial burn wound healing with honey and silver sulfadiazine. Burns 1998;24(2):157-161.

Subrahmanyam M. Early tangential excision and skin grafting of moderate burns is superior to honey dressing: a prospective randomised trial. Burns 1999;25(8):729-731.

Subrahmanyam M. Honey dressing versus boiled potato peel in the treatment of burns: a prospective randomized study. Burns 1996;22(6):491-493.

Subrahmanyam M. Honey impregnated gauze versus polyurethane film (OpSite) in the treatment of burns--a prospective randomised study. Br.J.Plast.Surg. 1993;46(4):322-323.

Subrahmanyam M. Storage of skin grafts in honey. Lancet 1-2-1993;341(8836):63-64.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

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