Coleus forskohlii (generic name)

treats Breathing aid for intubation, Cardiomyopathy, Glaucoma, Erectile dysfunction, Depression and schizophrenia, Asthma, Anti-inflammatory ac...
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

When used with other blooding thinning agents, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, coleus may increase the risk of bleeding.

Although not well studied in humans, forskolin may interact with antidepressants, antihistamines, blood pressure altering agents, asthma medications, beta-blockers, inotropic agents or thyroid medications. It may also interact with drugs used for cancer and weight loss, or drugs that are processed through the liver.

Coleus should be used cautiously when taken concurrently with agents that are dependent on pH and gastric action for breakdown and activation such as newer cephalosporin antibiotics, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and warfarin.

Although not well studied in humans, topical forskolin may significantly reduce intra-ocular pressure (IOP). When used with other medications that decrease IOP, it may result in additive effects.

Colenol, a compound isolated from coleus, stimulates insulin release and its use with blood sugaring lowering agents or exogenous insulin may result in additive effects.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

When used with other blooding thinning herbs or supplements, such as Ginkgo biloba and garlic, coleus may increase the risk of bleeding.

Although not well studied in humans, forskolin may interact with antidepressants, antihistamines, blood pressure altering agents, asthma agents, heart agents, inotropic agents or thyroid medications. It may also interact with herbs or supplements used for cancer and weight loss, or drugs that are processed through the liver.

Although not well studied in humans, topical forskolin may significantly reduce intra-ocular pressure (IOP). When used with other herbs or supplements that decrease IOP, it may result in additive effects.

Colenol, a compound isolated from coleus, stimulates insulin release, and its use with blood sugar lowering herbs or supplements, such as bitter melon, may result in additive effects.

Attribution

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Tracee Rae Abrams, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Chi Dam, PharmD (Northeastern University); Cathy DeFranco Kirkwood, MPH, CCCJS-MAC (MD Anderson Cancer Center); Dana A. Hackman, BS (Northeastern University); Jo Hermans, PhD (University of Leiden, the Netherlands); Tamara Milkin, PharmD (Northeastern University); Phuong Ngo, PharmD (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy); Erica Seamon, PharmD (Nova Southeastern University); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Mamta Vora, PharmD (Northeastern University); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Lisa Wendt, PharmD (Albany College of Pharmacy); Jen Woods, BS (Northeastern University).

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