Locoweeds (generic name)

treats Burns, Coronary artery disease, Heart failure, Immune stimulation, Smoking cessation, Mental performance, Cancer, Myocarditis/endocardit...
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Based on preliminary animal studies and limited human research, astragalus may decrease blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia and in those taking drugs that affect blood sugar. Serum glucose levels may need to be monitored by a healthcare provider, and medication adjustments may be necessary.

Preliminary reports of human use in China have noted decreased blood pressure at lower doses and increased blood pressure at higher doses. Animal research suggests possible blood pressure-lowering effects. Although well-designed studies are not available, people taking drugs that affect blood pressure should use caution and be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional. It has been suggested that beta-blocker drugs such as propranolol (Inderal®) or atenolol (Tenormin®) may reduce the effects on the heart of astragalus, although this has not been well studied.

Based on anecdotal reports, astragalus may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Based on animal research and traditional use, astragalus may act as a diuretic and increase urination. In theory, this may lead to dehydration or metabolic abnormalities (low blood sodium or potassium), particularly when used in combination with diuretic drugs such as furosemide (Lasix®), chlorothiazide (Diuril®), or spironolactone (Aldactone®).

Based on laboratory and animal studies, astragalus may possess immune stimulating properties, although research in humans is not conclusive. Some research suggests that astragalus may interfere with the effects of drugs that suppress the immune system, such as steroids or agents used in organ transplants. Better research is necessary before a firm conclusion can be reached.

Some sources suggest other potential drug interactions, although there is no reliable scientific evidence in these areas. These include reduced effects of astragalus when used with sedative agents such as phenobarbital or hypnotic agents like chloral hydrate; increased effects of astragalus when taken with colchicine; increased effects of paralytics such as pancuronium or succinylcholine when used with astragalus; increased effects of stimulants such as ephedrine or epinephrine; increased side effects of dopamine antagonists such as haloperidol (Haldol®); and increased side effects of the cancer drug procarbazine.

In theory, consumption of the tragacanth (gummy sap derived from astragalus) may reduce absorption of drugs taken by mouth, and should be taken at separate times.

Based on laboratory study, astragalus may be additive to ribavirin, acyclovir, or other antiviral agents.

Activity of lipid lowering (cholesterol lowering) medication may be potentiated.

Based on human study, activity of recombinant interferon 1 may be potentiated by astragalus.

Astragalus may also interact with antibiotics.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Based on preliminary animal studies and limited human research, astragalus may decrease blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking herbs or supplements that affect blood sugar. People using other herbs or supplements that may alter blood sugar levels, should be monitored closely by a healthcare professional while using astragalus. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Preliminary reports of human use in China have noted decreased blood pressure at lower doses and increased blood pressure at higher doses. Animal research suggests possible blood pressure-lowering effects. Although well-designed studies are not available, people taking herbs or supplements that affect blood pressure should use caution and be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional.

Based on anecdotal reports, astragalus may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs or supplements that increase the risk of bleeding. Examples include Ginkgo biloba and garlic (Allium sativum).

Based on animal research and traditional use, astragalus may act as a diuretic and increase urination. In theory, this may lead to dehydration or metabolic abnormalities (low blood sodium or potassium), particularly when used in combination with herbs or supplements that may possess diuretic properties.

Based on laboratory and animal studies, astragalus may possess immune stimulating properties, although research in humans is not conclusive. It is not known if astragalus interacts with other agents that are proposed to affect the immune system.

In theory, consumption of tragacanth (gummy sap derived from astragalus) may reduce the absorption of herbs or supplements taken by mouth, and should be taken at separate times.

Based on laboratory study, astragalus may inhibit the actions of immunosuppressants and potentiate the effects of immunostimulant herbs such as echinacea or Panax ginseng.

Activity of lipid lowering (cholesterol lowering) herbs may be potentiated.

Astragalus may interact with antibacterial herbs and supplements, CNS stimulants, hypnotics, hormonal herbs and supplements, licorice, rauwolfia alkaloids, and sedatives.

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