Withania somnifera (generic name)

treats Osteoarthritis, Diuretic, High cholesterol, Parkinson's disease, Longevity/anti-aging, and Diabetes
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

In theory, ashwagandha may increase the effects of amphetamines.

Ashwagandha may possess androgenic (testosterone-like) properties, based on rat evidence of increased testicular weight and spermatogenesis.

Ashwagandha has been reported to significantly increase coagulation time, although the significance in humans is not clear. In theory, effects may be additive with anticoagulants.

Based on limited human research (in patients with type 2 diabetes), ashwagandha may lower blood sugar levels and therefore may interact with diabetic medications, although the mechanism is unknown.

Ashwagandha may lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and may therefore alter the effects of blood pressure lowering drugs.

Ashwagandha has been associated with cholinesterase inhibition, and caution is warranted when taken with cholinesterase inhibiting medications. Examples of cholinesterase inhibitors include: donepezil (Aricept®), rivastigmine (Exelon®), galantamine (Reminyl®), tacrine (Cognex®), neostigmine (Prostigmin®), edrophonium chloride (Tensilon®), and pyridostigmine bromide (approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use after exposure to the nerve gas Soman).

Ashwagandha extract may reduce cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression/leukopenia and urotoxicity. Caution is advised when taking ashwagandha with cyclophosphamide or immunomodulating drugs.

Although not well studied in humans, ashwaganda may increase paclitaxel's effectiveness on lung cancer. Repeated administration of ashwagandha may attenuate the development of tolerance to narcotics. Ashwagandha may also improve tardive dyskinesia symptoms caused by haloperidol (Haldol®).

Ashwagandha may cause sedation and possible life-threatening respiratory depression, and may interact with sedatives, hypnotics, or other central nervous system depressants. In early research, ashwagandha was reported to increase the effects of barbiturates and ethanol.

Ashwagandha may cause hyperthyroidism based on data suggesting thyroid stimulation and increased T4 serum levels, and therefore may interact with drugs for hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

Ashwagandha may also interact with diuretics (water pills) or chemotherapy agents.

Interactions with Herbs & Supplements

Ashwagandha may reduce 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan) levels.

Although not well studied in humans, ashwagandha has been reported to stimulate thyroid function, including increased serum T4 concentrations.

Ashwagandha has been reported to significantly increase coagulation (blood clotting) time, although the significance in humans is not clear. In theory, effects of anticoagulant agents and the risk of bleeding may be increased.

Based on limited human research (in patients with type 2 diabetes), ashwagandha may lower blood sugar levels and therefore may interact with diabetic agents, although the mechanism is unknown.

Ashwagandha may lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and may therefore increase the effects of other hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) agents.

Ashwagandha is rich in iron. Ashwagandha also contains arginine, and may therefore add to the total dose and effects when taken with arginine supplements.

Ashwagandha contains ornithine, and may therefore add to the total dose and effects when taken with ornithine.

Ashwagandha may possess androgenic (testosterone-like) properties, based on rat evidence of increased testicular weight and spermatogenesis. Saw palmetto possesses 5-alpha reductase properties similar to finasteride (Proscar®), and may antagonize potential androgenic effects of ashwagandha.

Ashwagandha may cause sedation and possible life-threatening respiratory depression, and may interact with sedatives, hypnotics, or other central nervous system depressants.

Ashwagandha may also interact with diuretics (water pills).

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