Mesoglycan (generic name)

treats Atherosclerosis, Vein clots, Intermittent claudication, Chronic venous ulcers, Venous disorders, and Cerebral ischemia
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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Aortic extract may inhibit vascularization and caution is advised when taking aortic acid with any antiangiogenic drugs, which prevent new vessel growth.

Aortic acid may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Aortic acid may lower total cholesterol and VLDL-triglyceride levels while raising HDL cholesterol and lipoprotein lipase activity. Caution is advised in patients taking cholesterol-lowering medications, such as statins (simvastatin).

Although not well studied in humans, aortic extract may alter blood pressure. Patients with high or low blood pressure or those taking blood-pressure lowering agents should use cautiously.

Aortic extracts may inhibit the growth of tumors. In theory, aortic acid may have additive effects when used concomitantly with other antitumor agents. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

Cigarette smoke may reduce the activity of aortic acid.

Mesoglycan may decrease fibrinogen concentration and regulate fibrinolysis. Caution is advised in patients taking any fibrinolytics agents, which act to dissolve blood clots.

Although not well studied in humans, female sex hormones may affect aortic acid mucopolysaccharides' effect on atherosclerosis. Caution is advised in patients taking hormone replacement therapy or birth control pills.

Mesoglycan may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Bovine aorta extract may inhibit immune response. Caution is advised in patients taking any herbs or supplements with immunomodulating activity because in theory, there may be interactions.

Thyroid drugs may affect aortic acid mucopolysaccharides' effect on atherosclerosis. In theory, combination of aortic acid with herbs or supplements used for thyroid disorders may cause an interaction.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Aortic acid may reduce the formation of blood clots, and mesoglycan may regulate fibrinolysis. In theory, aortic acid may interact with herbs with anticoagulating ("blood thinning") effects. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

Aortic acid may lower total cholesterol and VLDL-triglyceride levels while raising HDL cholesterol and lipoprotein lipase activity. Caution is advised when taking aortic acid with herbs that have cholesterol-lowering effects, such as red yeast rice.

Although not well studied in humans, aortic extract may alter blood pressure. Patients taking herbs for high blood pressure or patients with low blood pressure should use with caution.

Aortic extracts may inhibit the growth of tumors. Caution is advised in patients taking any herb that has antitumor effects.

Female sex hormones may affect aortic acid mucopolysaccharides' effect on atherosclerosis. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements with hormonal (estrogenic or progestic) effects.

Mesoglycan may slightly lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Bovine aorta extract may exert significant dose-dependent inhibition of lymphocyte response. Caution is advised when taking aortic extract in combination with other immunomodulating herbs or supplements.

Thyroid drugs may affect aortic acid mucopolysaccharides' effect on atherosclerosis.

Administration of vitamin C during copper deficiency may lead to an increase in aortic acid. However, copper deficiency itself may lead to an increase in aortic acid.

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