Alexander technique
The Alexander technique is an educational program that teaches movement patterns and postures, with an aim to improve coordination and balance,...

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Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Asthma (chronic): There is not enough scientific evidence to make a strong recommendation for the use of the Alexander technique in asthma patients. More study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Back pain: There is limited evidence in this area, and no firm conclusion can be drawn based on scientific research.
Grade: C

Balance: Limited research suggests that functional reach performance may be improved through Alexander technique instruction, particularly in people older than 65 years. Better quality evidence is needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: C

Lung function: There is a small amount of research on the effects of the Alexander technique on lung function in healthy people and musicians who play wind instruments. Until better evidence is available, it remains unclear if the Alexander technique improves lung capacity.
Grade: C

Parkinson's disease : Early research suggests that Alexander technique instruction may improve fine and gross movements and reduce depression in patients with Parkinson's disease. Additional human research is needed before a clear recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Posture in children: The Alexander technique has been suggested as a means to improve children's postural development. The long-term effects of such instruction are not known.
Grade: C

Stuttering: There is not enough scientific evidence to make a strong recommendation for the use of the Alexander technique in patients who stutter. More study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chronic pain : Early case series data suggest that Alexander technique instruction may reduce symptoms in people with TMJ chronic pain. More human research is needed before a clear recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Anxiety, arthritis, athletic performance, carpal tunnel syndrome, chronic bronchitis, chronic fatigue syndrome, cognitive performance enhancement, coordination disorders, depression, digestion disorders, endurance, epilepsy, fibromyalgia, frozen shoulder, headache, heart disease, high blood pressure, hip pain, hoarse voice, increased energy, joint disorders, labor and delivery (improving breathing, promoting relaxation), laryngitis, leg cramps, low energy, Lyme disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, neck pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, panic disorder, performance anxiety, physical endurance, pregnancy (reducing back strain, minimizing compression of internal organs or blood vessels, improving ability to rise from sitting position), repetitive strain injury, rheumatic disorders, sciatica, sleep disorders, spine problems (scoliosis), stiffness, stomach ulcers (peptic ulcer disease), stress/stress-related problems, stroke, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendonitis, tennis elbow, tension-related sexual disorders, voice strain.
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