5-hydroxytryptophan (generic name)

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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

When 5-HTP is used with drugs that act within the central nervous system, there may be an increased risk of adverse effects. Examples of such drugs include carbidopa, fluoxetine (Prozac®), buspirone (Buspar®), phenelzine (Nardil®), amitriptyline (Elavil®), phenobarbital, trazodone (Desyrel®), venlafaxine (Effexor®), tramadol (Ultram®), sumatriptan (Imitrex®), mirtazapine (Remeron®), and pindolol. If a patient experiences muscle aches, fever, or other abnormalities when taking 5-HTP with other drugs, a healthcare professional should be notified immediately. In contrast, drugs such as methysergide or cyproheptadine may reduce the effects of 5-HTP.

5-HTP may enhance the serotonergic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Since 5-HTP increases serotonin levels, when combined with an SSRI, the serotonin level may be increased sufficiently to produce serotonin syndrome. Anecdotally, zolpidem has been associated with exacerbating hallucinations when taken with SSRIs. Its use with 5-HTP may result in a similar effect. Serotonin receptor antagonists, such as methysergide and cyproheptadine, may diminish efficacy of 5-HTP.

Concomitant use of serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) can cause serotonin syndrome. The addition of 5-HTP may potentiate the antidepressant effect of MAOIs and decrease time to recovery from depression.

Losartan® (angiotensin receptor blocker) may cause a decrease in pineal serotonin levels.

Administration of 5-HTP with decarboxylase inhibitors can increase the plasma concentration and half-life of 5-HTP.

5-HTP, when taken with fenfluramine, may cause suppression in food intake.

Lithium carbonate may enhance serotonin receptor sensitivity, whereas tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and second-generation antidepressants may diminish serotonin receptor sensitivity.

Anecdotally, concomitant use of reserpine and 5-HTP may result in hypertensive (high blood pressure) reactions.

The 5-HTP-induced increase in plasma cortisol can be blocked by the administration of ritanserin, a 5-HT2/5-HT1C antagonist.

Although human evidence is lacking, 5-HTP may interact with angiotensin II receptor antagonist (A2R blockers) and thyroid stimulating hormones. 5-HTP has also been shown to increase luteinizing hormone, although the effects on hormones in humans are unclear.

In theory, 5-HTP may have additive effects with sedatives or medications taken for epilepsy or seizures.

5-HTP has produced weight loss in the obese. In theory, 5-htp may interact additively or synergistically with other weight loss agents. Furthermore, based on animal study, 5-HTP may improve locomotor function and survival in ALS patients when taken with riluzole.

It has been suggested that 5-HTP may reduce psychotic symptoms and mania or aid in panic disorder, but studies in people with schizophrenia have shown differing results. Caution is advised.

5-HTP may alter the concentrations of certain agents metabolized by the liver or interact with agents eliminated through the kidneys

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

In theory, L-tyrosine, adenosyl-L-methionine, tryptophan, vitamin B6, chromium, melatonin, niacin, SAMe, St. John's wort, herbs and supplements with monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) activity, and magnesium may increase the effects or side effects associated with 5-HTP.

Although human evidence is lacking, 5-HTP may interact with herbs or supplements with proposed antidepressant effects or thyroid stimulating effects. 5-HTP has also been shown to increase luteinizing hormone, although the effects on hormones in humans are unclear.

When 5-HTP is used with agents that act within the central nervous system, there may be an increased risk of adverse effects. In theory, use with St. John's wort may increase serotonin levels, resulting in adverse effects, including serotonin syndrome.

In theory, 5-HTP may have additive effects with sedatives or agents taken for epilepsy or seizures. 5-HTP has produced weight loss in the obese. In theory, 5-HTP may interact additively or synergistically with other weight loss agents.

It has been suggested that 5-HTP may reduce psychotic symptoms and mania or aid in panic disorder, but studies in people with schizophrenia have shown different results. Caution is advised.

5-HTP may alter the concentrations of certain agents metabolized by the liver or interact with agents eliminated through the kidneys

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