thioguanine (generic name)

Tabloid (brand name)

It is used to treat some leukemias
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What is this medicine?

THIOGUANINE (6-TG) (thye oh GWAH neen) is a chemotherapy drug. It is used to treat some leukemias.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • infection (especially virus infection such as chickenpox or herpes)
  • liver disease
  • low blood counts like low platelets, red blood cells, or white blood cells
  • thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) deficiency
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to thioguanine, other chemotherapy, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, skip that dose unless your prescriber or health care professional tells you otherwise. Do not take double or extra doses. If you vomit after taking a dose, call your prescriber or health care professional for advice.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • balsalazide
  • busulfan
  • medicines to increase blood counts like filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, sargramostim
  • medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin
  • mesalamine, 5-ASA
  • olsalazine
  • sulfasalazine
  • vaccines

Talk to your doctor or health care professional before taking any of these medicines:

  • aspirin
  • acetaminophen
  • ibuprofen
  • ketoprofen
  • naproxen

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

This drug may make you feel generally unwell. This is not uncommon, as chemotherapy can affect healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Report any side effects. Continue your course of treatment even though you feel ill unless your doctor tells you to stop.

In some cases, you may be given additional medicines to help with side effects. Follow all directions for their use.

Call your doctor or health care professional for advice if you get a fever, chills or sore throat, or other symptoms of a cold or flu. Do not treat yourself. This drug decreases your body's ability to fight infections. Try to avoid being around people who are sick.

This medicine may increase your risk to bruise or bleed. Call your doctor or health care professional if you notice any unusual bleeding.

Be careful brushing and flossing your teeth or using a toothpick because you may get an infection or bleed more easily. If you have any dental work done, tell your dentist you are receiving this medicine.

Avoid taking products that contain aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen unless instructed by your doctor. These medicines may hide a fever.

Do not become pregnant while taking this medicine. Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information. Do not breast-feed an infant while taking this medicine.

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Last Updated: September 02, 2009
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