oxycodone (generic name)

It is used to treat constant pain that lasts for more than a few days
(ox i KOE done)
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What is this medicine?

OXYCODONE (ox i KOE done) is a pain reliever. It is used to treat constant pain that lasts for more than a few days. It is used by people who have been taking an opioid or narcotic pain medicine.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • Addison's disease
  • brain tumor
  • drug abuse or addiction
  • head injury
  • heart disease
  • if you frequently drink alcohol-containing drinks
  • kidney disease or problems going to the bathroom
  • liver disease
  • lung disease, asthma, or breathing problems
  • mental problems
  • stomach or intestine problems
  • trouble swallowing
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to oxycodone, codeine, hydrocodone, morphine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a full glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not cut, crush or chew this medicine. Swallow only one tablet at a time. Do not wet, soak, or lick the tablet before you take it. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach, take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • alcohol
  • antihistamines
  • carbamazepine
  • certain medicines used for nausea like chlorpromazine, droperidol
  • erythromycin
  • ketoconazole
  • medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances
  • medicines for sleep
  • muscle relaxants
  • naloxone
  • naltrexone
  • narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain
  • nilotinib
  • phenobarbital
  • phenytoin
  • rifampin
  • ritonavir
  • voriconazole

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your pain does not go away, if it gets worse, or if you have new or a different type of pain. You may develop tolerance to the medicine. Tolerance means that you will need a higher dose of the medication for pain relief. Tolerance is normal and is expected if you take this medicine for a long time.

Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your body becomes used to the medicine. This does NOT mean you are addicted. Addiction is a behavior related to getting and using a drug for a non-medical reason. If you have pain, you have a medical reason to take pain medicine. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

You may get drowsy or dizzy when you first start taking the medicine or change doses. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that may be dangerous until you know how the medicine affects you. Stand or sit up slowly.

There are different types of narcotic medicines (opiates) for pain. If you take more than one type at the same time, you may have more side effects. Give your health care provider a list of all medicines you use. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. Do not take more medicine than directed. Call emergency for help if you have problems breathing.

This medicine will cause constipation. Try to have a bowel movement at least every 2 to 3 days. If you do not have a bowel movement for 3 days, call your doctor or health care professional.

You may see empty tablets in your stool. Do not worry. The medicine is in your body.

Your mouth may get dry. Drinking water, chewing sugarless gum, or sucking on hard candy may help. See your dentist every 6 months.

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Last Updated: August 23, 2012
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