medroxyPROGESTERone injection (generic name)

It contraceptive injections prevent pregnancy
(me DROX ee proe JES te rone)
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What is this medicine?

MEDROXYPROGESTERONE (me DROX ee proe JES te rone) contraceptive injections prevent pregnancy. They provide effective birth control for 3 months. Depo-subQ Provera 104 is also used for treating pain related to endometriosis.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • frequently drink alcohol
  • asthma
  • blood vessel disease or a history of a blood clot in the lungs or legs
  • bone disease such as osteoporosis
  • breast cancer
  • diabetes
  • eating disorder (anorexia nervosa or bulimia)
  • high blood pressure
  • HIV infection or AIDS
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • mental depression
  • migraine
  • seizures (convulsions)
  • stroke
  • tobacco smoker
  • vaginal bleeding
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to medroxyprogesterone, other hormones, medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Depo-Provera Contraceptive injection is given into a muscle. Depo-subQ Provera 104 injection is given under the skin. These injections are given by a health care professional. You must not be pregnant before getting an injection. The injection is usually given during the first 5 days after the start of a menstrual period or 6 weeks after delivery of a baby.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. These injections have been used in female children who have started having menstrual periods.

What if I miss a dose?

Try not to miss a dose. You must get an injection once every 3 months to maintain birth control. If you cannot keep an appointment, call and reschedule it. If you wait longer than 13 weeks between Depo-Provera contraceptive injections or longer than 14 weeks between Depo-subQ Provera 104 injections, you could get pregnant. Use another method for birth control if you miss your appointment. You may also need a pregnancy test before receiving another injection.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • bosentan

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • aminoglutethimide
  • antibiotics or medicines for infections, especially rifampin, rifabutin, rifapentine, and griseofulvin
  • aprepitant
  • barbiturate medicines such as phenobarbital or primidone
  • bexarotene
  • carbamazepine
  • medicines for seizures like ethotoin, felbamate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, topiramate
  • modafinil
  • St. John's wort

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

This drug does not protect you against HIV infection (AIDS) or other sexually transmitted diseases.

Use of this product may cause you to lose calcium from your bones. Loss of calcium may cause weak bones (osteoporosis). Only use this product for more than 2 years if other forms of birth control are not right for you. The longer you use this product for birth control the more likely you will be at risk for weak bones. Ask your health care professional how you can keep strong bones.

You may have a change in bleeding pattern or irregular periods. Many females stop having periods while taking this drug.

If you have received your injections on time, your chance of being pregnant is very low. If you think you may be pregnant, see your health care professional as soon as possible.

Tell your health care professional if you want to get pregnant within the next year. The effect of this medicine may last a long time after you get your last injection.

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Last Updated: January 08, 2010
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