apomorphine (generic name)

It is used to treat 'off' episodes in advanced Parkinson's disease
(a poe MOR feen)
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What is this medicine?

APOMORPHINE (a poe MOR feen) is used to treat 'off' episodes in advanced Parkinson's disease. These episodes affect your ability to move or perform tasks.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • asthma or other breathing problems
  • heart disease
  • history of alcohol or drug abuse
  • kidney or liver disease
  • low blood pressure
  • mental illness
  • sleep disorder
  • stroke
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to apomorphine, sulfites, other medicines foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. You will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. You will also need to take a medicine to prevent nausea and vomiting for at least the first two months of therapy. Use exactly as directed. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on the advice of your doctor or health care professional.

It is important that you put your used needles and syringes in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or healthcare provider to get one.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply. This medicine is only given as needed to treat 'off' episodes in Parkinson's disease. Contact your health care provider if your symptoms do not respond to the first dose for a particular 'off' episode. Do not use a second dose for that episode. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • certain antibiotics like grepafloxacin and sparfloxacin
  • cisapride
  • medicines for irregular heart beat like amiodarone, disopyramide, dofetilide, flecainide, ibutilide, procainamide, quinidine, sotalol
  • droperidol
  • halofantrine
  • levomethadyl
  • pimozide
  • some medicines for nausea like alosetron, dolasetron, dronabinol, droperidol, granisetron, ondansetron, palonosetron
  • ziprasidone

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • alfuzosin
  • certain antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, troleandomycin
  • medicines for high blood pressure or chest pain (angina)
  • medicines to treat or prevent malaria like chloroquine or mefloquine
  • metoclopramide
  • phenothiazines like chlorpromazine, mesoridazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine
  • some medicines for depression like amitriptyline, amoxapine, maprotiline, mirtazapine, nefazodone, nortriptyline
  • some medicines for mental disturbances like clozapine, haloperidol, molindone, olanzapine, pimozide, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone

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Last Updated: November 12, 2010
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