Muscular Dystrophy symptoms
Muscular Dystrophy

Symptoms could include:

  • If your child has an intellectual disability (ID), their brain doesn't develop properly. Their brain may also not function within the normal range of both intellectual and adaptive functioning. In the past, medical professionals called this condit...
    Source:HLCMS
  • True muscle weakness means that full effort does not produce a normal muscle contraction or movement. A voluntary muscle contraction is generated when the brain sends a signal through the spinal cord and nerves to a muscle.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Muscle weakness happens when your full effort doesn't produce a normal muscle movement. Learn when it might be a sign of a serious medical condition.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Children reach developmental milestones at their own pace. Minor delays aren't cause for concern. Ongoing delays can be. Read more on developmental delays.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Muscle stiffness is feeling of tension and contraction in the muscles, that may limit normal range of motion. Sometimes muscles feel stiff after periods of vigorous use, for example athletic activities, physical labor or weight lifting.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:December 31, 2007
  • Muscle stiffness is when your muscles feel tight and you find it more difficult to move than usual, especially after rest. You may also have muscle pains, cramping, and discomfort.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Unsteady gait is a symptom of instability while walking. Problems with walking can be due to disease or injury to the legs, feet, spine, or brain.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
  • Unsteady gait is a problem with walking in a coordinated manner maintaining postural control. Unsteady when walking, unstable when walking, unstable gait, instability of gait, disequibrilium when walking, disequilibrium when walking.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hypotonia, or poor muscle tone, is usually detected at birth or during infancy. If your infant has hypotonia, they may appear limp at birth and not be able to keep their knees and elbows bent. Your child may continue to struggle with feeding and m...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Drooling is defined as saliva flowing outside of your mouth unintentionally. It's often a result of weak or underdeveloped muscles around your mouth or having too much saliva.
    Source:HLCMS
  • "Ptosis" is the medical term for a drooping upper eyelid. Eyelid drooping can sometimes affect your vision if it's severe. Ptosis isn't a disease. It's actually a symptom of a condition that you should seek treatment for.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Gait, the process of walking, and balance are intricate movements. They rely on proper functioning from several areas of the body, including the:

    • ears
    • eyes
    • brain
    • muscles
    • sensory nerves
    Source:HLCMS
  • Kyphosis, also known as roundback or hunchback, is a condition in which the spine in the upper back has an excessive curvature. The upper back, or thoracic region of the spine, is supposed to have a slight natural curve. The spine naturally curves...
    Source:HLCMS
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