Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) complications
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Complications could include:

  • Tuberculosis (TB) is a highly infectious disease that primarily affects the lungs. A severe and long-lasting cough, fever, and night sweats could indicate an active TB infection.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a cancerous tumor. It commonly appears in multiple locations on the skin and around the nose, mouth, genitals, and/or anus, but can also attack the internal organs. It's caused by a virus called the human herpes virus 8 (H...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle. It is a rare condition that can be caused by any number of autoimmune diseases, viral, bacterial, or fungal infections, or parasites. When you have an infection or an allergic reaction, your immune ...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hepatitis B is liver inflammation caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). It can be chronic or acute, but most cases are chronic. This disease is easily spread through blood, saliva, and other body fluids.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hepatomegaly is the enlargement of the liver. It is a cause for medical evaluation, although not all of its underlying conditions are medical emergencies. Common causes of hepatomegaly are metastatic cancer, congestive heart failure, lymphoma, alc...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Malaria is a life-threatening disease. It is typically transmitted through the bite of a mosquito infected with Anopheles. Nausea, chills, fever, and diarrhea are common symptoms.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Molluscum contagiosum is a skin infection that is caused by the molluscum virus. It produces benign raised lesions, or bumps, on the upper layers of your skin.
    Source:HLCMS
  • A toxoplasma or toxoplasmosis test is a blood test that is used to determine if you have the antibodies to protect your body from the Toxoplasma gondii parasite in your body. Your body only makes these antibodies once you have been infected by thi...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by parasites found in cat feces and undercooked meat, symptoms of which include swollen lymph nodes and fever.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Histoplasmosis is an infection caused by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum (H. capsulatum). The fungus is commonly found in the eastern United States, particularly in the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys. It is spread through bird and bat droppi...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Histoplasmosis is a noncommunicable disease caused by certain fungal spores. Red bumps on the lower legs are one sign of this condition.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Diarrhea is a condition classified as the appearance of loose, watery stools and/or a frequent need to go to the bathroom. It generally lasts a few days and often disappears without any treatment. Diarrhea may be related to a viral or bacterial in...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hepatitis A (HAV) is a short-term type of hepatitis. It usually requires no treatment, but symptoms include fever, nausea, jaundice, and itchy skin, among others.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Cardiomyopathy is a progressive disease of the heart muscle. Learn about the types, symptoms, treatment, and prognosis of this disease.
    Source:HLCMS
  • A variety of tests can determine the type of influenza virus in less than 30 minutes, though they are not as accurate as tests that take longer to obtain results.
    Source:HLCMS
  • The flu is a contagious respiratory disease caused by the influenza virus. It causes fever, chills, fatigue, body aches, sore throat, and cough.
    Source:HLCMS
  • The flu generally takes a disproportionate toll on certain high-risk groups through secondary infections or other complications. Those who are especially at risk include the elderly, the pregnant, and people with weakened immune system.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Endocarditis is inflammation of the inner lining of the heart. Possible symptoms of this condition include pale skin, chills, and night sweats.
    Source:HLCMS
  • CAD occurs when one or more of the coronary arteries begin to narrow due to the build-up of cholesterol and plaque. The blockage of one of these arteries leads to a heart attack.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Your primary care doctor, such as an internist or general practitioner, will likely be your first line of defense against coronary artery disease (CAD). He or she will likely suggest preventive lifestyle changes, prescribe any necessary medication...
    Source:HLCMS
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