Head Injury complications
Head Injury

Complications could include:

  • Seizures are changes in the brain's electrical activity that cause violent shaking and loss of bodily control. Bruises can result from injuries sustained during a seizure.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of twenty different kinds of epilepsy. It is characterized by recurring seizures that stem from the medial or lateral temporal lobes of the brain.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Coma, from the Greek word "koma," meaning deep sleep, is a state of extreme unresponsiveness, in which an individual exhibits no voluntary movement or behavior.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Pseudobulbar palsy is an inability to control the muscles in the face. It can have a large impact on a person's ability to speak.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Apnea is slowed or stopped breathing that usually occurs during sleep. Bruises can result from the mask worn to aid in breathing, called CPAP.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Aphasia is a communication disorder that affects the brain's ability to use and understand language. Aphasia can interfere with your use of verbal and/or written communication.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Rinne and Weber tests are exams that test for hearing loss. They determine whether a patient has conductive or sensorineural hearing loss.
    Source:HLCMS
  • After years of trying and failing to find a distinct relationship between type 2 diabetes and hearing loss, recent studies have confirmed that relationship. In 2008, the National Institute of Health (NIH) found that hearing loss is twice as common...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hearing loss is when you are unable to partially or completely hear sound in one or both of your ears. In most people, hearing loss begins after age 20 (MedlinePlus). Hearing loss typically occurs gradually over time, but by the time a person reac...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Communication disorders can affect how a person receives, sends, processes, and understands concepts.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Personality changes are alterations in the behavior, thinking and interactions of a person from their established character. These changes may be indicative of chemical dependencies, psychiatric illness, dementia, trauma, illness, altered body chemistry or temperature, or poisoning.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
  • Smell is a chemical sensation, also known as olfaction. It occurs when airborne chemicals are detected by chemical receptors that line the nasal cavity.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Anosmia is the partial or complete loss of the sense of smell. This loss may be temporary or permanent. Common conditions that irritate the nose's lining, such as allergies or a cold, can lead to temporary anosmia. More serious conditions that aff...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Dysarthria is a motor-speech disorder. It causes the inability to coordinate or control the muscles in your face, mouth, and respiratory system.
    Source:HLCMS
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