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Adult Brain Tumor symptoms
Adult Brain Tumor

Symptoms could include:

  • It's up to you to help others know and understand how your epilepsy affects you. With knowledge comes understanding.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of twenty different kinds of epilepsy. It is characterized by recurring seizures that stem from the medial or lateral temporal lobes of the brain.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Epilepsy is a complex and often confusing disorder. It can be scary if a loved one has a seizure and you don't know what to expect or how to respond.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Memory change, or memory loss, is partial or complete loss of memory caused by a physical or psychological condition.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Personality changes are alterations in the behavior, thinking and interactions of a person from their established character. These changes may be indicative of chemical dependencies, psychiatric illness, dementia, trauma, illness, altered body chemistry or temperature, or poisoning.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
  • When a condition or disorder temporarily or permanently interferes with the normal sense of sight, this is called a visual disturbance.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Being tired is the familiar aftermath of physical exertion, prolonged labor or lack of sleep. When does being tired become a symptom of a condition? Fatigue, malaise, lassitude, exhaustion are all subtle variations of the same subjective feelings of not having enough energy to meet the demands of one's life.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Hypersomnia is a condition that causes a patient to feel sleepy throughout the day.
    Source:HLCMS
  • It is normal to have periods of low energy when one needs to rest and recuperate. However, if low energy persists and a person continually feels sluggish, disinterested in life, and has low energy, the situation should be investigated by a physician.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Communication disorders can affect how a person receives, sends, processes, and understands concepts.
    Source:HLCMS
  • After years of trying and failing to find a distinct relationship between type 2 diabetes and hearing loss, recent studies have confirmed that relationship. In 2008, the National Institute of Health (NIH) found that hearing loss is twice as common...
    Source:HLCMS
  • Clumsiness is a common problem in otherwise healthy children with normal intelligence. Motor coordination problems may affect the ability to perform age-appropriate activities, such as dressing and running.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:December 31, 2007
  • A generalized tonic-clonic seizure, sometimes called a grand mal seizure, is a disturbance in the functioning of both sides of your brain.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Hearing loss can be caused by many things – some reversible such as wax buildup in the ear canal or ear infections with fluid build up. Some hearing loss is irreversible – that due to mechanical problems within the ear itself, or sensorineural problems within the inner ear.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
  • Smell is a chemical sensation, also known as olfaction. It occurs when airborne chemicals are detected by chemical receptors that line the nasal cavity.
    Source:HLCMS
  • Impaired sensation is often a signal that there something affecting a nerve or the nervous system. Changes in sensations are often subjective and difficult to describe, that is, experienced by the patient but difficult for the provider to diagnose and treat.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:October 31, 2007
  • Hazy vision, cloudy vision, blurred vision are all problems with seeing clearly. Any change in your normal vision is cause for concern and is a good reason to call a doctor for an examination.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:September 30, 2007
  • Sometimes a person feels hot to touch due to illness or environmental situation that causes elevated core temperature. A compounding factor can be dehydration (lack of fluids.
    Source:Healthline
  • Aimless movements can be a symptom of a primary or secondary movement disorder, side effect of a medication, psychiatric disturbance or dementia. Aimless or purposeless movement is therefore a significant symptom requiring evaluation by a physician to determine the origin of the problem.
    Source:Healthline
    Date:November 30, 2007
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